A Synthetic Cell That Produces Anti-Cancer Drugs Within a Tumor

Novel technology induced cancer cell eradication in both cultured cells and in a tumor tissue

Article ID: 689498

Released: 13-Feb-2018 3:05 PM EST

Source Newsroom: American Technion Society

Newswise — Technion researchers successfully treated a cancerous tumor using a “nano-factory” – a synthetic cell that produces anti-cancer proteins within the tumor tissue. The research, which was published in Advanced Healthcare Materials, combines synthetic biology, to artificially produce proteins, and targeted drug delivery, to direct the synthetic cell to abnormal tissues.

The synthetic cells are artificial systems with capacities similar to, and, at times, superior to those of natural cells. Just as human cells can generate a variety of biological molecules, the synthetic cell can produce a wide range of proteins. Such systems bear vast potential in the tissue engineering discipline, in production of artificial organs and in studying the origins of life.

Design of artificial cells is a considerably complex engineering challenge being pursued by many research groups across the globe. The present research, in which an artificial cell serves as a nanofactory for generating proteins within abnormal tissue, was led by the doctoral student Nitzan Krinsky and Assistant Professor Avi Schroeder, at the Wolfson Faculty of Chemical Engineering at the Technion.

The researchers integrated molecular machines within lipid-based particles resembling the natural membrane of biological cells. They engineered the particles such that when they “sense” the biological tissue, they are activated and produce therapeutic proteins, dictated by an integrated synthetic DNA template. The particles recruit the energy sources and building blocks necessary for their continued activity, from the external microenvironment (e.g., the tumor tissue).

After experiments in cell cultures in the lab, the novel technology was also tested in mice. When the engineered particles reached the tumor, they produced a protein that eradicated the cancer cells. The particles and their activity were monitored using a green fluorescent protein (GFP), generated by the particles. This protein can be viewed in real-time, using a fluorescence microscope.

“By coding the integrated DNA template, the particles we developed can produce a variety of protein medicines,” said Professor Schroeder. “They are modular, meaning they allow for activation of protein production in accordance with the environmental conditions. Therefore, the artificial cells we’ve developed at the Technion may take an important part in the personalized medicine trend – adjustment of treatment to the genetic and medical profile of a specific patient.”

The research was performed in collaboration with Professor Itai Benhar from Tel Aviv University and Dr. Dov Hershkovitz from the Sourasky Medical Center. The research was supported by the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, the Lorry I. Lokey Interdisciplinary Center forLife Sciences & Engineering, the Pre-Clinical Research Authority staff and the Biomedical Core Facility at the Rappaport Faculty of Medicine.

The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology is a major source of the innovation and brainpower that drives the Israeli economy, and a key to Israel’s renown as the world’s “Start-Up Nation.” Its three Nobel Prize winners exemplify academic excellence. Technion people, ideas and inventions make immeasurable contributions to the world including life-saving medicine, sustainable energy, computer science, water conservation and nanotechnology.

American Technion Society (ATS) donors provide critical support for the Technion—nearly $2.5 billion since its inception in 1940. Based in New York City, the ATS and its network of supporters across the U.S. provide funds for scholarships, fellowships, faculty recruitment and chairs, research, buildings, laboratories, classrooms and dormitories, and more.

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