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Article ID: 692983

Why Don’t Kids Use Their Asthma Medicines? Children, Caregivers and Clinicians Disagree on the Answer

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a new analysis of interviews conducted with children who have asthma, their caregivers and their clinicians, Johns Hopkins researchers found that there was significant lack of agreement about why the kids miss their needed daily anti-inflammatory medication.

Released:
18-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 656560

Corn's Nitrogen Need, Eating for AMD Prevention, The Perils of Food Packaging, and More in the Food Science News Source

Newswise

Click here to go to the Food Science News Source

Released:
13-Apr-2018 4:25 PM EDT
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    13-Apr-2018 12:15 AM EDT

Article ID: 692545

Brief Exposure to Tiny Air Pollution Particles Triggers Childhood Lung Infections

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Even the briefest increase in airborne fine particulate matter PM2.5, pollution-causing particles that are about 3 percent of the diameter of human hair, is associated with the development of acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) in young children, according to newly published research. Increases in PM2.5 levels also led to increased doctor visits for these lung infections.

Released:
10-Apr-2018 4:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692514

What Does Asthma Have to Do with Your Allergies? Probably a Lot

American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

Some of what you think are allergy symptoms could be signs of asthma.

Released:
10-Apr-2018 11:20 AM EDT
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Article ID: 667765

A New Drug for Pediatric Cancer, Four-Legged Help, Neurocognitive Side Effects in Young Leukemia Survivors, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Newswise

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

Released:
30-Mar-2018 4:55 PM EDT
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Article ID: 667700

Health Disparities Narrow, Cardio vs. Resistance, Fruit Fly Famines, and More in the Obesity News Source

Newswise

Click here to go directly to Newswise's Obesity News Source

Released:
23-Mar-2018 2:50 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691545

The Medical Minute: Asthma Differences in Adults and Children

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

As the winter cold season melts into seasonal spring allergies, many people may start to experience sneezing, wheezing and other breathing difficulties. Sometimes, the trouble goes away after a few days, but if it lingers or recurs, asthma could be the culprit.

Released:
21-Mar-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691521

Immunotherapy Trials for Food Allergy Hold Strong Appeal for Parents

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Two-thirds of surveyed caregivers felt that their child’s food allergy affected their own daily lives very much or extremely, according to a report in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Two-thirds of caregivers also expressed significant fear that their child would have an allergic reaction to food. Despite this fear, the majority of caregivers were eager to enroll their child in a clinical trial for immunotherapy, which involves giving the child a gradually increasing dose of the food allergen under close supervision in order to train the immune system to not react to that food. Only 8 percent of caregivers responded that they would not enroll their child in this type of clinical trial.

Released:
21-Mar-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 691368

Quintupling Inhaler Medication May Not Prevent Asthma Attacks in Children

Case Western Reserve University

Children with mild to moderate asthma do not benefit from a common practice of increasing their inhaled steroids at the first signs of an asthma exacerbation, according to clinical trial results published in The New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers found short-term increases in inhaled steroids did not prevent attacks in children aged 5 to 11, and may even slow a child’s growth.

Released:
19-Mar-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691370

Pregnant Women and New Moms Still Hesitant to Introduce Peanut Products

American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

A new study shows that pregnant women and new moms aware of the 2017 guidelines on early introduction of peanuts to prevent allergy are still hesitant to put them in place. And not everyone has heard about them.

Released:
19-Mar-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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