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Article ID: 693183

Scientists Re-Create Brain Neurons to Study Obesity and Personalize Treatment

Cedars-Sinai

Scientists have re-created brain neurons of obese patients using "disease in a dish" technology, offering a new method to study the brain's role in obesity and possibly help tailor treatments to specific individuals.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693191

Scientists Identify 170 Potential Lung Cancer Drug Targets Using Unique Cellular Library

UT Southwestern Medical Center

After testing more than 200,000 chemical compounds, UT Southwestern’s Simmons Cancer Center researchers have identified 170 chemicals that are potential candidates for development into drug therapies for lung cancer.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 3:50 PM EDT
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    19-Apr-2018 12:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 692729

Molecule That Dilates Blood Vessels Hints at New Way to Treat Heart Disease

Scripps Research Institute

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified a protein, called GPR68, that senses blood flow and tells small blood vessels called arterioles when to dilate.

Released:
12-Apr-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692866

Human Protein Important for Cellular Communication Resembles Bacterial Toxin

University of Chicago Medical Center

A protein that plays an important role in embryonic development and nervous system wiring in humans appears to have been borrowed from bacteria. In a new study, scientists from the UChicago and Stanford describe the three-dimensional structure of proteins called teneurins for the first time.

Released:
16-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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    19-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 693128

Study May Explain Why Some Triple-Negative Breast Cancers Are Resistant to Chemotherapy

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive form of the disease accounting for 12 to 18 percent of breast cancers. It is a scary diagnosis, and even though chemotherapy can be effective as standard-of-care, many patients become resistant to treatment. A team at The University of Texas MD Anderson led a study which may explain how resistance evolves over time, and potentially which patients could benefit from chemotherapy.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692946

New Clues Point to Relief for Chronic Itching

Washington University in St. Louis

Studying mice, researchers have found that a drug called nalfurafine hydrochloride (Remitch) can deliver itch relief by targeting particular opioid receptors on neurons in the spinal cord. The new study suggests that the drug may be effective against many types of chronic itching that don’t respond to conventional drugs such as antihistamines.

Released:
17-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692726

Immune-Engineered Device Targets Chemo-Resistant Lymphoma

Cornell University

Cornell University researchers have developed a “lymphoma micro-reactor” device that exposes human lymphomas to fluid flow similar to that in the lymphatics and parts of the lymph node. It is designed to explore how fluid forces may relate to a tumors’ drug resistance.

Released:
12-Apr-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692721

Why Alcohol, Sugar Lead to Thirst

UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern researchers identify a hormone that acts on the brain to increase the desire to drink water in response to specific nutrient stresses that can cause dehydration.

Released:
12-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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    11-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692412

Specific Bacteria in the Small Intestine Are Crucial for Fat Absorption

University of Chicago Medical Center

A new study—one of a few to concentrate on microbes in the upper gastrointestinal tract—shows how the typical calorie-dense western diet can induce expansion of microbes that promote the digestion and absorption of high-fat foods. Over time, the steady presence of these microbes can lead to over-nutrition and obesity.

Released:
9-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692426

Genetic Screening Tool Identifies How the Flu Infiltrates Cells

University of Chicago Medical Center

Researchers at the University of Chicago have developed a genetic screening tool that identified two key factors that allow the influenza virus to infect human lung cells. The technique uses new gene editing tools to create a library of modified cells, each missing a different gene, allowing scientists to see which changes impact their response to flu. This in turn could identify potential targets for antiviral drugs.

Released:
9-Apr-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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