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Caution Needed for Drugs in Development for Most Common Malignant Pediatric Brain Tumor

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Inhibiting the Ezh2 enzyme may be counterproductive for treatment of certain cancers, including the aggressive brain tumor Group 3 medulloblastoma

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Brain-Aging Gene Discovered

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Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have discovered a common genetic variant that greatly affects normal brain aging in older adults. The discovery may point toward new targets for preventing or treating age-associated brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.

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Aging, Nutrition, nutrition and aging, Geriatric, Geriatric Medicine, Stem Cells, intestinal stem cell, IN, rese, Cell Reports, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Wnt Protein, Wnt Signaling, news, press release, Pediatrics, Science

Study Identifies Molecular Clues for Age-Related Intestinal Issues

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Intestinal stem cells rejuvenate daily so bowels will stay healthy and function normally, but a new study in Cell Reports suggests they also age along with people and lose their regenerative capacity. Reporting their data online March 14, researchers suggest that reactivating the signaling of a key molecule lost in aging intestinal stem cells could restore healthy intestinal function in older people.

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Aging, cellular metabolism, Endocrinology

Mayo Clinic Discovers High-Intensity Aerobic Training Can Reverse Aging Processes in Adults

Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell Metabolism.

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Cancer, Oral Cancer, Oral Health, Head And Neck Cancer, Squamos Cell Carcinoma, Tumors, tumors mice, Cancer Stem Cells

Targeting Cancer Stem Cells Improves Treatment Effectiveness and Prevents Metastasis

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Targeting cancer stem cells may be a more effective way to overcome cancer resistance and prevent the spread of squamous cell carcinoma — the most common head and neck cancer and the second-most common skin cancer, according to a new study by cancer researchers at the UCLA School of Dentistry. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is a highly invasive form of cancer and frequently spreads to the cervical lymph nodes.

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Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, phase separation, Hydrogels, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease

Molecules Form Gels to Help Cells Sense and Respond to Stress

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A specific protein inside cells senses threatening changes in its environment, such as heat or starvation, and triggers an adaptive response to help the cell continue to function and grow under stressful conditions, according to a new study by scientists from the University of Chicago.

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Mitochondria, Calcium, Bacteriology, Cell Biology

Controlling Energy Production by Calcium Is an Organ-Specific Affair

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Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University have shown that the composition of the mitochondrial calcium portal (the protein that regulates when and how much calcium enters) is different depending on the organ in the body, and this difference allows mitochondria to tune their energy output by decoding a pattern of amplitude and/or frequency of calcium oscillations inside a cell. The results, published March 7 in the journal Cell Reports, could shed light on our basic understanding of organ health and disease.

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Ovarian Cancer, Biomarker, Protein Biomarker, serous ovarian cancer, princess margaret cancer centre, University Health Network

Ovarian Cancer Researchers Identify Biomarker Linked to Prognosis in Aggressive Disease Type

Ovarian cancer researchers have identified a protein biomarker expressed on the surface of tumour cells in high-grade serous ovarian cancer, the most common and lethal subtype of the disease.

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Cancer, drug resp

Genetic ‘Balance’ May Influence Response to Cancer Treatment

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Choosing among cancer treatments increasingly involves determining whether tumor cells harbor specific, mutated “oncogenes” that drive abnormal growth and that may also be especially vulnerable or resistant to particular drugs. But according to a new study led by UCSF researchers, in the case of the most commonly mutated cancer-driving oncogene, called KRAS (pronounced “kay-rass”), response to treatment can change as tumors evolve, either when a normal copy of the gene from the other member of the matched chromosome pair is lost, or when the cancers cells evolve to produce additional copies of the mutated form of the gene.

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Susan Lindquist, Hsp90, Protein Folding Stress, Genetic Mutation, Disease

Researchers Uncover a Role for HSP90 in Gene-Environment Interactions in Humans

Researchers at Whitehead Institute have now uncovered a role for the protein-folding chaperone HSP90 in humans, not only as a modifier of the effects of mutations, but as a mediator of the impact of the environment on the function of mutant proteins. And these effects of HSP90 can alter the course of human diseases.







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