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Article ID: 696474

New Cellular Pathway Helps Explain How Inflammation Leads to Artery Disease

Cedars-Sinai

Investigators have identified a new cellular pathway that may help explain how arterial inflammation develops into atherosclerosis—deposits of cholesterol, fats and other substances that create plaque, clog arteries and promote heart attacks and stroke. The findings could lead to improved therapies for atherosclerosis, a leading cause of death worldwide.

Released:
21-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696467

Scripps Research study provides new clues to improving chemotherapies

Scripps Research Institute

The microbiome may harbor a gene for drug resistance

Released:
21-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696364

Fetal T cells are first responders to infection in adults

Cornell University

Cornell University researchers have discovered there is a division of labor among immune cells that fight invading pathogens in the body.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696178

Temple University Scientists Eradicate Cancer Cells Through Dual Targeting of DNA Repair Mechanisms

Temple University

Proteins commonly known as BRCA – short for BReast CAncer susceptibility gene– serve a critical role in cellular DNA repair, but when mutated they allow genetic errors to replicate, facilitating cancer development. If the BRCA repair system is disabled in cancer cells, the cells simply turn to backup repair mechanisms and adapt to alternative repair pathways, a survival mode that also underlies their ability to evade targeted drug therapies.

Released:
15-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    14-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695774

Researchers pinpoint new subtype of prostate cancer

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers led by the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have identified a new subtype of prostate cancer that occurs in about 7 percent of patients with advanced disease. This subset of tumors were responsive to immunotherapy treatment.

Released:
7-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    14-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695970

Scientists Have Captured the Elusive Cell That Can Regenerate an Entire Flatworm

Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have captured the one cell that is capable of regenerating an entire organism.

Released:
12-Jun-2018 10:30 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    14-Jun-2018 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695743

The Same Characteristics Can Be Acquired Differently When It Comes to Neurons, New Research Shows

New York University

Distinct molecular mechanisms can generate the same features in different neurons, a team of scientists has discovered. Its findings enhance our understanding of brain cell development.

Released:
8-Jun-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696091

Descubrimiento de Mayo Clinic es primer paso en nuevo tratamiento con bacterias contra el estreñimiento

Mayo Clinic

Las bacterias genéticamente manipuladas se muestran esperanzadoras como nuevo tratamiento contra el estreñimiento, descubrieron los investigadores del Centro para Medicina Personalizada de Mayo Clinic en un estudio realizado en ratones.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696079

Mayo Clinic discovery is first step toward new bacteria-based constipation treatment

Mayo Clinic

Genetically engineered bacteria are showing promise as a new treatment for constipation, researchers at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine have discovered in a mouse study. The finding is significant in part because there are few approved constipation remedies on the market. The research is published in Cell Host & Microbe.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696010

Researchers Map the Genome of Testicular Cancer

University of North Carolina Health Care System

In a collaborative, multi-institution effort to map the genetic and genomic changes in cancer, researchers led by UNC Lineberger's Katherine Hoadley, PhD, analyzed 137 testicular germ cell tumors for potential mutations and other molecular changes. They identified molecular features of testicular germ cell cancers that could inform future efforts to improve treatment decisions, and help monitor patients to see if their cancer has come back. Their findings were published in Cell Reports.

Released:
12-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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