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Science

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Hologram, Optics, Special Effects

Holograms Taken to New Dimension

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Using sophisticated algorithms and a new fabrication method, a University of Utah team of electrical and computer engineers has discovered a way to create inexpensive full-color 2-D and 3-D holograms that are far more realistic, brighter and can be viewed at wider angles than current holograms.

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Air Pollution, diesel fuel, Gasoline, Chemistry, University of Montreal, Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, Los Angeles, secondary organic aerosol

Diesel Is Now Better Than Gas

Regulators, take note: A new international study shows that modern diesel passenger cars emit fewer carbonaceous particulates than gasoline-powered vehicles.

Science

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Oceanogaphy, Coral, Coral Decline, Pacific Ocean, Florida State University, Amy Baco-Taylor

FSU Researcher Makes Deep-Sea Coral Reef Discovery in Depths of North Pacific

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FSU researcher discovers unlikely coral reefs in the hostile waters of the North Pacific.

Medicine

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bats, Pathogens, Viruses, Parasites, Diseases, Animal Research, Veterinary Medicine, Entomology

Study Reveals Interplay of an African Bat, a Parasite and a Virus

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A lack of evidence that bats are key reservoirs of human disease has not prevented their vilification or efforts to exterminate bat colonies where threats are presumed to lurk. “The fact is that they provide important ecosystem services ... and we want them around,” says Tony Goldberg, a University of Wisconsin-Madison epidemiologist and virus hunter. “But bats are also increasingly acknowledged as hosts of medically significant viruses. I have mixed feelings about that.”

Medicine

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Brain Injury, University of Birmingham

Researchers Hope New Biomarkers Will Lead to Potentially Life-Saving Sports Pitch-Side Test for Brain Injury

Researchers at the University of Birmingham have identified inflammatory biomarkers which indicate whether the brain has suffered injury. The team, led by Professor Antonio Belli, at the University’s College of Medical and Dental Sciences, now hopes to use these new biomarkers to develop a test which can be used on the side of a sports pitch or by paramedics to detect brain injury at the scene of an incident.

Science

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Microbiome, skin

What’s On Your Skin? Archaea, That’s What

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It turns out your skin is crawling with single-celled microorganisms – ¬and they’re not just bacteria. A study by the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the Medical University of Graz has found that the skin microbiome also contains archaea, a type of extreme-loving microbe, and that the amount of it varies with age.

Science

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dinosaur discovery, Dinosaur, dinosaur physiology, Dinosaurs, neurovascular networks, Palaeontology, 3D imaging, Fossils, Trigeminal, Feeding, Courtship, Nests

Sensitive Faces Helped Dinosaurs Eat, Woo and Take Temperature, Suggests Study

Dinosaurs' faces might have been much more sensitive than previously thought, and crucial to tasks from precision eating and testing nest temperature to combat and mating rituals, according to a University of Southampton study.

Medicine

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Allergen, Peanut Allergy, peanut allergens, Nanoparticle, nanoallergen, allergy testing

Novel Platform Uses Nanoparticles to Detect Peanut Allergies

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University of Notre Dame researchers have developed a novel platform to more accurately detect and identify the presence and severity of peanut allergies, without directly exposing patients to the allergen.

Medicine

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Nature, Anthropology, Animal Research

Wild Monkeys Use Loud Calls to Assess the Relative Strength of Rivals

Gelada males—a close relative to baboons—pay attention to the loud calls of a rival to gain information about his relative fighting ability compared to themselves, a new study indicated.

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Paleoclimatology, Holocene, 8.2 Ka Event, Climate Change, California

Wet and Stormy Weather Lashed California Coast…8,200 Years Ago

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An analysis of stalagmite records from White Moon Cave in the Santa Cruz Mountains shows that 8200 years ago the California coast underwent 150 years of exceptionally wet and stormy weather. It is the first high resolution record of how the Holocene cold snap affected the California climate.







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