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Article ID: 696246

Great White Sharks Dive Deep Into Warm-Water Whirlpools in the Atlantic

University of Washington

Tracking of two great white sharks reveals for the first time that in the open ocean they spend more time deep inside warm-water eddies.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696172

To Share or Not to Share?

University of Vienna

When are primary school children willing to share valuable resources with others and when are they not? A team of researchers from the University of Vienna lead by cognitive biologist Lisa Horn investigated this question in a controlled behavioural experiment. The motivation to share seems to be influenced by group dynamical and physiological factors, whereas friendship between the children seems to be largely irrelevant. The results of their study have been published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Released:
15-Jun-2018 5:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 695944

Mount Sinai Team Diagnoses Asthma With Nasal Brush Test

Mount Sinai Health System

RNA sequencing and machine learning applied to develop new asthma biomarker

Released:
11-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695647

Nanotechnology for Plant Nutrition

American Technion Society

Technion researchers have found they can significantly increase agricultural yields, by using nanoscale delivery platforms that until now were used to transport drugs to specific targets in a patient's body. The technology increases the penetration rate of nutrients into the plant, from 1% to approximately 33%.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 4:20 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695242

Researchers Create Advanced Brain Organoid to Model Strokes, Screen Drugs

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists have developed a 3-D brain organoid that could have potential applications in drug discovery and disease modeling.

Released:
29-May-2018 3:20 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695044

Researchers Image Cellular Damage Done by Diabetic Retinopathy

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

A new technique offers a 'molecular fingerprint' for functional groups, such as proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, which can signal the development of retinal disease

Released:
23-May-2018 3:40 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694838

Dogs Born in the Summertime More Likely to Suffer Heart Disease

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Dogs born June through August are at higher risk of heart disease than those born other months, rising in July to 74 percent higher risk, according to a study published this week in Scientific Reports from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A correlation to outdoor air pollution may be the culprit.

Released:
18-May-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694680

Colon Cancer Cells Use Mysterious RNA Strands to Avoid Cell Death

Case Western Reserve University

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have discovered how unusually long strands of RNA help colon cancer cells avoid death, allowing unregulated growth. Unlike other RNAs, the intriguing strands do not appear to encode proteins and are termed “long non-coding RNAs” or “lincRNAs.”A new study showed some lincRNAs could be targeted by drug developers to halt colon cancer.

Released:
16-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694481

Dozens of Binaries From Milky Way’s Globular Clusters Could Be Detectable by LISA

Northwestern University

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A string of detections -- four more binary black holes and a pair of neutron stars -- soon followed the Sept. 14, 2015, observation. Now, another detector is being built to crack this window wider open. This next-generation observatory, called LISA, is expected to be in space in 2034, and it will be sensitive to gravitational waves of a lower frequency than those detected by the Earth-bound Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO).

Released:
11-May-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694371

UCLA-Led Research Finds Vaccines Against Anthrax, Plague and Tularemia Are Effective in Mice

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Anthrax, plague and tularemia are three potent agents terrorists would be likely to use in an attack, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Each is highly and quickly lethal to humans. But there are no licensed vaccines for tularemia and plague, and although there is an anthrax vaccine, it requires a burdensome immunization schedule and has severe side effects.

Released:
10-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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