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Medicine

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Malaria, Malaria Research, Cerebral Malaria

Penn State Develops First of a Kind Model to Research Post-Malaria Epilepsy

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A first of its kind mouse model could lead to an understanding of how cerebral malaria infection leads to the development of epilepsy in children and to the prevention of seizures.

Science

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Non-breeders, University of Vienna, Social Groups, Ravens, Cognitive Skills, Thomas Bugnyar, Cognitive Biology, Intelligence, scientific reports

Ravens: Non-Breeders Live in Highly Dynamic Social Groups

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Ravens have impressive cognitive skills when interacting with conspecifics – comparable to many primates, whose social intelligence has been related to their life in groups. An international collaboration of researchers led by Thomas Bugnyar, Professor at the Department of Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna, could uncover for the first time the group dynamics of non-breeding ravens. The results help to understand the evolution of intelligence in this species and were published in the scientific journal "Scientific Reports".

Science

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Seal Beach, California, Wetlands, Earthquakes, paleoseismology, U.S. Geological Survey

Sinking of Seal Beach Wetlands Tied to Ancient Quakes

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When geologists went in search for evidence of ancient tsunamis along Southern California’s coastal wetlands, they found something else. Their discoveries have implications for seismic hazard and risk assessment in coastal Southern California.

Medicine

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Neurologial, Brain, Imaging, high resolution imaging, Diagnostic

Piece of Mind

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With just an inexpensive micro-thin surgical needle and laser light, University of Utah engineers have discovered a minimally invasive, inexpensive way to take high-resolution pictures of an animal brain, a process that also could lead to a much less invasive method for humans.

Science

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Thermoelectric Materials, discovery of materials, Engineering, Materials Science

Lust for Power

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University of Utah engineers have discovered a new material made from a combination of the chemical elements calcium, cobalt and terbium that can create an efficient, inexpensive and bio-friendly material that can generate electricity through a thermoelectric process involving heat and cold air.

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For Female Mosquitoes, Two Sets of Odor Sensors Are Better Than One

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A team of Vanderbilt biologists has found that the malaria mosquito has a second complete set of odor receptors that are specially tuned to human scents.

Medicine

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Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea, pediatric OSA, Gray Matter, Grey Matter, MRI scanning, Cognitive Deficits, Neurons, Brain Cells, Loss or damage to brain cells, Cognitive Function, IQ

Untreated Sleep Apnea in Children Can Harm Brain Cells Tied to Cognition and Mood

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A study comparing children 7 to 11 years old with moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea to children the same age who slept normally found significant reductions of gray matter – brain cells crucial to most cognitive tasks – in several regions of the brains of children with sleep apnea. The finding points to connections between this common sleep disturbance and the loss of neurons or delayed neuronal growth in the developing brain.

Medicine

Science

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Disease Outbreak, Empathy, Game Theory

Empathy From the Sick May Be Critical to Halting Disease Outbreaks

A little empathy can go a long way toward ending infectious disease outbreaks. That’s a conclusion from researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, who used a networked variation of game theory to study how individual behavior during an outbreak of influenza – or other illness – affects the progress of the disease, including how rapidly the outbreak dies out.

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Michigan Tech, Simon Carn, Volcano, sulfur dioxide, Remote Sensing, NASA

Volcano Breath: Measuring Sulfur Dioxide From Space

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A number of volcanoes around the world continuously exhale gases. Of these, sulfur dioxide is the easiest to detect from space and now researchers have created the first global map of SO2 plumes from volcanoes.

Medicine

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stem cell-regulating gene , John Yu, John S Yu , Brain Cancer, Brain Tumor, Glioma, ZEB1

Cedars-Sinai Neuroscientists Pinpoint Key Gene Controlling Tumor Growth in Brain Cancers

Cedars-Sinai investigators have identified a stem cell-regulating gene that affects tumor growth in patients with brain cancer and can strongly influence survival rates of patients. The findings, published in the online edition of Nature Scientific Reports, could move physicians closer to their goal of better predicting the prognosis of patients with brain tumors and developing more personalized treatments for them.







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