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Medicine

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Neurotoxins In Shark Fins: A Human Health Concern

Sharks are among the most threatened of marine species worldwide due to unsustainable overfishing. They are primarily killed for their fins to fuel the growing demand for shark fin soup, which is an Asia delicacy. A new study by University of Miami (UM) scientists in the journal Marine Drugs has discovered high concentrations of BMAA in shark fins, a neurotoxin linked to neurodegenerative diseases in humans including Alzheimer’s and Lou Gehrig Disease (ALS). The study suggests that consumption of shark fin soup and cartilage pills may pose a significant health risk for degenerative brain diseases.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Researcher Investigates - “Are We Getting Sick From Boat Harbour?”

Dalhousie University researcher Heather Castleden has been invited by the Pictou Landing Native Women's Association (PLNWA) to engage in community-based participatory health research in the area in search of a definitive answer to the question; "Are we getting sick from Boat Harbour?"

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Expert Available to Comment on the Human Health Aspects of the UN’s Newly Announced Initiative for Climate Change and Clean Air

Dr. Lynn Goldman, Dean of the GW School of Public Health and Health Services is available to comment on the human health aspects of the newly announced UN initiative for climate change and clean air aimed at reducing short-lived climate pollutants

Medicine

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Short-Term Exposure to Most Major Air Pollutants Associated with Increased Risk of Heart Attack

Short-term exposure (for up to 7 days) to all major air pollutants, with the exception of ozone, is significantly associated with an increased risk of heart attack, according to a review and meta-analysis of previous studies appearing in the February 15 issue of JAMA.

Medicine

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Stroke, Air Pollution

Even Moderate Air Pollution Can Raise Stroke Risks

Air pollution, even at levels generally considered safe by federal regulations, increases the risk of stroke by 34 percent, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center researchers have found.

Medicine

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Cognitive Decline, Air Pollution, Women, Adults, Exposure

Study Finds Association Between Air Pollution and Cognitive Decline in Women

A large, prospective study led by a researcher at Rush University Medical Center indicates that chronic exposure to particulate air pollution may accelerate cognitive decline in older adults.

Science

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Air Pollutant Levels of Particulates and Ozone Add to Public Health Burden

Recent research reveals that despite major reductions, levels of ozone and particulates in the air continue to raise health concerns, especially in urban areas.

Science

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K-State, Kansas State University, manindu weerasinghe, Chemistry, air, Pollution, Toxin, Green

Chemistry Research Offers a Breath of Fresh Air Against Indoor Pollutants

A chemist is making and studying materials that decrease toxins in the air by either turning the lights on or off in a room.

Medicine

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asthma burden, Air Pollution, Children, economic cost

Asthma Rate and Costs from Traffic Pollution Higher

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A team of resource economist researchers has revised the cost burden sharply upward for childhood asthma and for the first time include the number of cases attributable to air pollution, in a study released this week in the early online version of the European Respiratory Journal.

Medicine

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Obesity, Childhood Obesity, Environmental Health

Chemical In Personal Care Products May Contribute To Child Obesity

Researchers from the Children’s Environmental Health Center at The Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York have found an association between exposure to the chemical group known as phthalates and obesity in young children – including increased body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference.







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