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Article ID: 590064

NIH, EPA Announce Competition to Develop Personal Air Pollution and Health Sensors

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

A competition to create a personal sensor system that measures air pollution and a person’s physiological response to it will offer cash awards to finalists, federal officials announced today. The goal is to help researchers, communities, and physicians better understand the connection between air quality and health.

Released:
6-Jun-2012 4:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 589958

ACOEM Journal Focuses on Health Hazards in Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans

Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

With the goal of preparing to manage the health concerns of returning U.S. veterans, the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM), is devoting its June issue to the health effects of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Released:
1-Jun-2012 2:20 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    31-May-2012 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 589818

Weather Patterns Can Be Used to Forecast Rotavirus Outbreaks

Tufts University

By correlating weather factors like temperature, rain and snowfall, Elena Naumova, Ph.D., professor of civil and environmental engineering at Tufts School of Engineering, is able to predict the timing and intensity of rotavirus, a disease that causes extreme diarrhea, dehydration and thousands of death annually, particularly among children. Her research focused on one of the hardest-hit regions of the world, South Asia.

Released:
29-May-2012 3:40 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    28-May-2012 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 589635

Working with Solvents Tied to Cognitive Problems for Less-Educated People

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Exposure to solvents at work may be associated with reduced thinking skills later in life for those who have less than a high school education, according to a study published in the May 29, 2012, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
22-May-2012 2:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 589697

Scientists Warn of Increased Nuclear Radiation Risks

Better Health Publishing

Recent news reports and scientific reviews warn that nuclear radiation exposure is more serious than we believed. Just recently, the UK Guardian published an article titled, “Fukushima reactor shows radiation levels much higher than thought.” Another recent story published in Scientific American, finds California kelp contaminated with elevated levels of radioactive iodine. A review from the Max-Planck Society estimates that the risks of another serious nuclear accident are significantly higher than previously thought. As reports continue to reveal elevated nuclear radiation levels in Japan and elsewhere, public concerns about the safety of Fukushima and other reactor sites are reignited.

Released:
24-May-2012 5:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 589632

Surgeon General Invites Oil Spill Workers to Join the NIH Gulf Study: New PSAs Issued Today

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

Two years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, some cleanup workers and volunteers have raised questions about their health. Today, the Surgeon General, Dr. Regina M. Benjamin, a Gulf State native, issued new TV and radio public service announcements (PSAs) inviting oil spill cleanup workers and volunteers to participate in the GuLF STUDY (Gulf Long-term Follow-up Study), a national effort to determine whether the oil spill contributed to physical or mental health problems.

Released:
22-May-2012 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 589563

Mercury in Dolphins: Study Compares Toxin Levels in Captive and Wild Sea Mammals

Johns Hopkins University

A small pilot study found higher levels of toxic mercury in dolphins downwind of power plants than in captive dolphins.

Released:
21-May-2012 11:30 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-May-2012 8:15 AM EDT

Article ID: 589266

Prenatal Pollution Exposure Dangerous for Children with Asthma

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

The link between prenatal exposure to air pollution and childhood lung growth and respiratory ailments is well established, and now a new study suggests that these prenatal exposures can be especially serious for children with asthma.

Released:
14-May-2012 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 589515

Loyola Lactation Consultant Reacts to Report on Toxins in Breast Milk

Loyola University Health System

When writer Florence Williams was nursing her second child, she had her breast milk analyzed for toxins. What she found surprised her. Trace amounts of pesticides, dioxin, a jet-fuel ingredient and high-to-average levels of flame retardants were present in her breast milk. She reported on these findings in New York Times Magazine, which has since set off a wave of controversy. A Loyola University Health System lactation consultant puts these findings in perspective.

Released:
18-May-2012 11:30 AM EDT
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Article ID: 588898

Why Do Everest Climbers Matter to Patients Near Sea Level? Mayo Experts Explain

Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic’s Mount Everest expedition is exploring heart problems, sleep apnea, muscle wasting, calorie burning and other health issues faced by patients and high-altitude climbers alike.

Released:
3-May-2012 2:35 PM EDT
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