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Science

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Genetic Disorder, Genetic Disorders, Genome, Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, Premature Aging, Heart Problems, Protein Coding, Genetics, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Binghamton, Cell Division, Epigenomics, Amino Acids, Nuclear Envelope

Confused Cells Lead to Genetic Disorders Like Heart Problems, Premature Aging

It has been disorienting to the scientific and medical community as to why different subtle changes in a protein-coding gene causes many different genetic disorders in different patients -- including premature aging, nerve problems, heart problems and muscle problems. no other gene works like this. According to a new study, co-authored by Binghamton University faculty Eric Hoffman, it has to do with cell “commitment.”

Medicine

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Testosterone, Heart Disease, Heart Attack

Research Links Heart Disease with Testosterone

Testosterone might be involved in explaining why men have a greater risk of heart attacks than women of similar age, according to a study funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC).

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Vitamins May Protect Against Nerve Damage in Breast Cancer Treatment, and more Cancer News in the Newswise Channels

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Compound From Hops Lowers Cholesterol, Blood Sugar and Weight Gain

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A recent study at Oregon State University has identified specific intake levels of xanthohumol, a natural flavonoid found in hops, that significantly improved some of the underlying markers of metabolic syndrome in laboratory animals and also reduced weight gain.

Medicine

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Dr. Douglas Lee, Breast Cancer, Institute For Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research, Dr. Dinesh Thavendiranathan, Herceptin, Heart Damage

Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Herceptin Treatment Should Be Monitored for Heart Damage Regardless of Age: Ontario Study

Breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with trastuzumab-containing regimens should be monitored for heart damage regardless of age. This is among the findings of a new study from the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) and the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research, University Health Network (UHN).

Medicine

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Nisa Maruther, Metformin, Diabetes, drug, Heart Disease, SGLT-2, Heart Attack, Sulfonylureas

Diabetes Drug, Metformin, Lowers Risk of Heart Disease Deaths Better Than Sulfonylureas, New Analysis Shows

A new analysis of 204 studies involving more than 1.4 million people suggests that metformin, the most frequently prescribed stand-alone drug for type 2 diabetes, reduces the relative risk of a patient dying from heart disease by about 30 to 40 percent compared to its closest competitor drug, sulfonylurea.

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Cancer, Enlarged Heart, Ut Southwestern, Ut Southwestern Medical Center, Heart Care, Joseph Hill, Cardiac Hypertrophy, Heart Cells, Cancer Cells

UT Southwestern Researchers Identify Enzyme Link Between Excessive Heart Muscle Growth, Cancer Growth

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UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiology researchers have identified molecular ties between the growth of cancer cells and heart cells that suggest existing cancer drugs may be able to help those with enlarged heart cells – a condition that can lead to heart attacks and stroke.

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World's Leading Expert on Aspirin at FAU Available to Discuss New Prevention Guidelines for Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer

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Medicine

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World Heart Games, ACSM, cardiac rehab, American College of Sports Medicine

2016 World Heart Games Reclaims Joy of Sports

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Olympic-style competition will be held May 20-21

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Implantable Device, Stent, Cardiology, Surgery, elliot chaikof, Beth Israel Deaconess, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Bidmc

Harvard Scientists Report on Novel Method for Extending the Life of Implantable Devices in situ

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In a paper published in the April 13 issue of Nature Communications, investigators from Harvard report on a novel biochemical method that enables the rapid and repeated regeneration of selected molecular constituents in situ after device implantation, which has the potential to substantially extend the lifetime of bioactive films without the need for device removal.







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