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Article ID: 659548

Researchers Convene to Explore Role of Inflammation, Immune Response in Cardiovascular Disease

American Physiological Society (APS)

A growing body of research points to the involvement of inflammation and the immune system on the development of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular physiologists and immunologists will meet to explore how these mechanisms interact at the Inflammation, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease conference in Westminster, Colo., on Aug. 24–27, 2016.

Released:
22-Aug-2016 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 659494

Severe Obesity Revealed as a Stand-Alone High-Risk Factor for Heart Failure

Johns Hopkins Medicine

A study by Johns Hopkins researchers of more than 13,000 people has found that even after accounting for such risk factors as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes, so-called morbid obesity appears to stand alone as a standout risk for heart failure, but not for other major types of heart disease.

Released:
22-Aug-2016 11:05 AM EDT
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    18-Aug-2016 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 659332

Mount Sinai Research Collaboration Identifies Genes Responsible for Risk of Developing Heart Attack, Stroke, and Related Cardiometabolic Diseases

Mount Sinai Health System

In a study being published in the August 19 issue of Science, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in collaboration with scientists from Tartu University Hospital in Estonia, the Karolinska Institutet and Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab) in Sweden, and AstraZeneca, have identified a profound new level of complexity and interaction among genes within specific tissues responsible for mediating the inherited risk for cardiometabolic diseases, including processes that lead to heart attack and stroke.

Released:
17-Aug-2016 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 659393

New Bioabsorbable Cardiac Stent Gradually Breaks Down into Water and Carbon Dioxide

Loyola University Health System

The Absorb® stent remains intact until the artery has healed and no longer is in danger of collapsing. The stent gradually breaks down into water and carbon dioxide. After three years the stent is completely dissolved. The vessel remains open on its own, with no need of support.

Released:
18-Aug-2016 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 665525

Imprecise Diagnoses

Harvard Medical School

Genetic testing has greatly improved physicians’ ability to detect potentially lethal heart anomalies among asymptomatic family members of people who suffer cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death. But a study from Harvard Medical School published in the Aug. 18 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine shows that over the last decade these lifesaving tools may have disproportionately misdiagnosed one cardiac condition — hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) – in black Americans.

Released:
17-Aug-2016 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 659223

Stony Brook Medicine Welcomes New Cardiothoracic Surgeons

Stony Brook University

Joanna Chikwe, MD, has been appointed as Chief of the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery in the Department of Surgery at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. Henry J. Tannous, MD, has been named Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery in the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery in the Department of Surgery.

Released:
16-Aug-2016 12:05 PM EDT
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    16-Aug-2016 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 658889

Studying Blood Flow Dynamics to Identify the Heart of Vessel Failure

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

New research from a fluid mechanics team in Greece reveals how blood flow dynamics within blood vessels may influence where plaques develop or rupture this week in Physics of Fluids. The findings could one day help doctors identify weak spots on a vessel wall that are likeliest to fail, and lead to early interventions in treating heart disease.

Released:
10-Aug-2016 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 659190

Mount Sinai Pioneers New Approach for Cardiac Arrhythmia Patients Using the EpiAccess® System

Mount Sinai Health System

The Mount Sinai Hospital is the first site in the New York metropolitan area to pioneer a new approach for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias using the EpiAccess® system.

Released:
16-Aug-2016 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 659178

Study Examining Tailored Anti-Platelet Heart Medication After Coronary Stent Receives Grant

University Health Network (UHN)

Researchers at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, with expertise running large clinical trials, and at Mayo Clinic, are leading the Tailored Antiplatelet Therapy to Lessen Outcomes after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (TAILOR-PCI) study. This study has received $7 million in additional funding from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Released:
16-Aug-2016 9:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 659143

‘Sit Less, Move More’ — Research Shows Sedentary Behavior Is Associated with Cardiovascular Morbidity and Mortality in Adults

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Sedentary behavior — even among physically active people — may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and more.

Released:
15-Aug-2016 4:05 PM EDT
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