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Cardiovascular Health

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Medicine

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Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, Lungs, High Blood Pressure

Researchers Reverse Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Mouse Models

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Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have identified a key protein that promotes the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension in humans and mice. This groundbreaking discovery has implications for future drug therapies that may extend the life of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and prevent the need for lung transplantation, currently the only cure for this debilitating disease.

Medicine

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Cardiovascular Disease, Hip Fracture

Diagnosis of Cardiovascular Disease Associated With Risk of Subsequent Hip Fracture

A study that includes twins finds that the risk of hip fracture was significantly increased following a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), with analysis also suggesting a genetic predisposition to the development of CVD and fractures, according to a study in the October 21 issue of JAMA.

Medicine

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Hypertension, Older Adults, High Blood Pressure

Never Too Old to Keep Blood Pressure in Check

Treating hypertension in adults 60 years old and older can help them live longer, healthier lives, according to an updated review.

Medicine

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Heart, Cardiac, RCTs, Randomized Clinical Trials, jeffrey s. berger, Nyu Langone Medical Center, Cardiovascular Disease, Race, Ethnicity, Ethnic Groups, Population, Diversity, Demographics

Race & Ethnic Demographics Not Reported in Over 50% of Randomized Clinical Trials for Cardiovascular Disease

A new study recently published online by the American Heart Journal shows that more than half of all randomized clinical trials, or RCTs, for cardiovascular disease are not reporting vital information about the study populations race or ethnicity. NYU School of Medicine researchers found that out of the 156 cardiovascular disease RCTs analyzed, only 35% of trials reported any information on race or ethnicity between 1970 and 2006. From 2000 to 2006, 46% of trials included that information.

Medicine

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Stroke Rehabilitation, Walking Exercise

Exercise Training After Stroke Helps Patients Walk Faster, Longer

An updated Cochrane review finds that stroke patients who participate in a post-stroke walking program walk faster, longer and more independently than non-exercisers.

Medicine

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High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Diurectics

Adding Diuretic to Drug Regimen Lowers Blood Pressure

A new review shows that diuretics — inexpensive drugs often recommended as a first-line treatment for high blood pressure — are also effective when added as a second agent to other blood-pressure lowering drugs.

Medicine

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Arterial Stiffness, Cardiovascular Disease

A Simple Way for Older Adults to Assess Arterial Stiffness: Reach for the Toes

How far you can reach beyond your toes from a sitting position may be an indicator of how stiff your arteries are. Because arterial stiffness often precedes cardiovascular disease, the results suggest that this could be a quick measure of a person’s risk for heart attack or stroke.

Medicine

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Vascular Disease Foundation, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Thromboembolism

CDC Grants Vascular Disease Foundation $1 Million to Promote the Health of People with Clotting Disorders

The Vascular Disease Foundation (VDF) received a $1 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to promote the health of women who suffer from, or are in danger of suffering from, venous thromboembolism (VTE).

Medicine

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chest compressions, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Circulation, emergency medical service (EMS) , Cardiac Arrest, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, Paramedics

Uninterrupted Chest Compressions Key to Survival in Cardiac Arrest Outside Hospital Setting

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Maximizing the proportion of time spent performing chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) substantially improves survival in patients who suffer cardiac arrest outside a hospital setting, according to a multicenter clinical study that included UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Medicine

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Atrial Fibrillation, Women, Mortality, Stroke

Women with Atrial Fibrillation Are at Significantly Higher Risk of Stroke and Death Compared to Men

Even though the incidence of atrial fibrillation is higher in men than women, a review of past studies and medical literature completed by cardiac experts at Rush University Medical Center shows that women are more likely than men to experience symptomatic attacks, a higher frequency of recurrences, and significantly higher heart rates during atrial fibrillation, which increases the risk of stroke.

Medicine

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Stroke, Eye Movement, Dizziness, Dizzy, MRI, Cholesterol, Blood Pressure, bedside exam

Cheap, Quick Bedside “Eye Movement” Exam Outperforms MRI for Diagnosing Stroke in Patients with Dizziness

In a small “proof of principle” study, stroke researchers at Johns Hopkins and the University of Illinois have found that a simple, one-minute eye movement exam performed at the bedside worked better than an MRI to distinguish new strokes from other less serious disorders in patients complaining of dizziness, nausea and spinning sensations.

Medicine

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African American Health, Deep Vein Thrombosis And Pulmonary Embolism, Surgeon General, Office Of Minority Health, Vascular Disease Foundation

African Americans at Significantly Higher Risk of DVT Or Blood Clots

African Americans have a significantly higher risk of developing potentially deadly DVT and PE compared with other ethnic populations in the U.S. The Office of Minority Health urges “Know Your Risk and Help Prevent Blood Clots.”

Medicine

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Blood Thinner, Anticoagulant, Medication, Blood Clots, DVT, PE, a-fib, Bilingual, Prevention, NEDS, Educational, Video

New Video Will Help Patients Use Blood Thinner Pills Safely and Effectively

AHRQ has released "Staying Active and Healthy with Blood Thinners," a new 10-minute video to help educate patients about how to use anticoagulant drugs, commonly called blood thinners, safely. The video is available in both English and Spanish.

Medicine

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chronic angina

Heart Study Shows Many Suffer Poor Quality of Life

The world’s largest quality of life study of chronic angina patients has revealed that almost one in three experience frequent chest pain, which affects their daily life.

Medicine

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Noninvasive Heart Care

The Story of the Development of Noninvasive Heart Care

In 1958, a team comprised of a groundbreaking engineer -- Dean Franklin -- in concert with two exceptional physicians -- Drs. Robert Rushmer and Robert Van Citters – was laying the foundation for what would eventually become a radical new approach to health care: the noninvasive imaging and treatment of the heart.

Medicine

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Sodium, Nutrition, Hypertension, High Blood Pressure, Health Policy, Health Care Costs

Cutting ‘Hidden’ Salt Could Lower Nation’s Blood Pressure

Many people think twice before adding a dash of salt to their food, but don’t realize that the majority of dietary sodium comes from packaged foods and eating out, according to a new study.

Medicine

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Heart Attack, Recovery from, Heart Attack, Heartadvantage, Congestive Heart Failure, CHF

New Hope for Heart Failure Patients

Cardiac resynchronization can delay the progression of heart failure, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The treatment reduced the risk of serious heart failure events by 41 percent.

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Patient-doctor Communication with Patients Who Have High Blood Pressure Is Worse for Blacks than for Whites

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Black patients with high blood pressure experience poorer communication with their doctors than white patients do, a study led by a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researcher has found.

Medicine

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Electrocardiogram, Sudden Cardiac Death, Qrs Duration, Daniel P. Morin

Regular Electrocardiograms May Help Physicians Identify Patients at Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

QRS duration (QRSd) is one of several measures of heart function recorded during a routine electrocardiogram (ECG). It is a composite of waves showing the length of time it takes for an electrical signal to get all the way through the pumping chambers of the heart. Prolonged QRSd is a sign of an abnormal electrical system of the heart and is often found when the heart isn't pumping efficiently.

Medicine

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Heart, Acute Coronary Syndromes, Gender, Women, men, Heart Attack, Angina, Nyu Langone Medical Center, Mortality, Death Rate

Women Slightly More Likely to Die than Men in the 30 Days Following a Heart Attack

A new study from NYU School of Medicine found that women may have a slightly higher risk of death than men in the thirty days following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), but that these differences appear to be attributable to factors such as severity and type of ACS. The study, published in the August 26, 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), found however that overall there was no significant difference in mortality observed between the sexes after a heart attack. The large observational study pooled 136,247 ACS patients from 11 independent, international randomized clinical trials between 1993 and 2006.







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