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Cardiovascular Health

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New Hope for Broken Hearts

Cardiovascular diseases are among the most frequent causes of death worldwide. The ability to repair a damaged heart is one of the grand visions of medical science. Cardiac regeneration is possible in fish and in newborn mice. But so far it has not been known whether human hearts can regenerate as well. Scientists at IMBA – Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna and the Innsbruck Medical University have described the first complete clinical and functional repair of a human heart following an acute heart attack in an infant. This astonishing discovery nourishes hope that cardiac repair in humans might be possible in the future.

Medicine

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Recently Approved Heart Drug Poses Potential Risk to Brain & Eye, Temple Researcher Warns

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Patients with mild heart failure stand to benefit from a new drug that can halt the progression of their disease and reduce their risk of cardiovascular-related death. But the drug -- a tablet that combines the agents valsartan and sacubitril, sold under the trade name Entresto by drugmaker Novartis -- may be too good to be true, according to Arthur M. Feldman, MD, PhD, Executive Dean of the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM), Chief Academic Officer of the Temple University Health System, and Laura H. Carnell Professor of Medicine at LKSOM.

Medicine

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Genetics, congenital heart disorders, congenital brain disorders, clinical genetics, Genome Sequencing, pediatric cardiac genetics, pediatric cardiology, Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Genomic Sequencing Finds Common Link in Congenital Heart and Brain Disorders

Researchers have found a number of genetic mutations that explain why many children with congenital heart disease also have other significant health challenges, including neurodevelopmental disorders and other congenital problems. The study was published in the December 3rd online edition of Science.

Medicine

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Sleep Disordered Breathing, Central Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Atrial fibrilation

Sleep-Disordered Breathing Patients at Greater Risk for Atrial Fibrillation

The researchers found that participants of a multicenter prospective cohort who had central sleep apnea or central sleep apnea with Cheyne-Strokes respiration, both caused by abnormal respiratory signals from the brain, were at greater risk of developing AF compared to those without central sleep-disordered breathing. The risk increased with age

Medicine

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pediatric cardiology, Genetics, CHD, Congenital Heart Disease, neurodevelopmental delay, Learning Disabilities, Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia, Genomics

In Child Heart Patients, Gene Effects Overlap in Cardiac, Brain Development

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Some of the same gene mutations that cause heart defects in children also lead to neurodevelopmental delays, including learning disabilities. New research may later enable clinicians to identify and treat infant heart patients at higher risk for neurodevelopmental problems.

Medicine

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Allergy, Asthma, children and allergies, High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol

Children with Common Allergies Have Twice Heart Disease Risk

Children with allergic disease, particularly asthma and hay fever, have about twice the rate of high blood pressure and high cholesterol, setting them on a course for heart disease at a surprisingly early age, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study.

Medicine

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Guidelines, Heart Surgery, CABG, CABG Surgery, Coronary Artery Bypass Graft, Heart Disease, Coronary Artery Disease

New Clinical Practice Guidelines Recommend Use of Arteries Rather than Veins in Heart Bypass Surgery

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons has released new clinical practice guidelines that recommend expanding the use of arteries from the chest and forearm rather than using veins from the leg when performing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery in certain patients

Medicine

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arterial wall inflammation, Clinton Robbins, University Of Toronto, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Heart Health, Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiology, White Blood Cells, Macrophage

U of T Scientists Redefine Arterial Wall Inflammation, Offering Hope for Cardiovascular Disease Treatment

Researchers from the University of Toronto have found that a specific cell type plays a key role in maintaining healthy arteries after inflammation. It’s a discovery that could provide treatment options for cardiovascular disease — one of the leading causes of death in Canada.

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Transcendental Meditation and Lifestyle Modification Increase Telomerase, New Study Finds

A new study published in PLOS ONE found that the Transcendental Meditation technique and lifestyle changes both appear to stimulate genes that produce telomerase, an enzyme that's associated with reduced blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and mortality.

Science

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Optogenetics, ion channel protein, Heart, Fruit Fly, Larva, PUPA, Laser, Heartbeat, Arrhythmias, Heart Disease, Pacemaker, Pacemaker Channels, Development, Development Disorders, Cardiac Arrest

Rhythm and Blues: Fly’s Heart Beats to the Pulse of a Blue Laser

It’s called optogenetics and it refers to the use of light to regulate cells. In this case, NIBIB-funded researchers engineered fruit flies that carry light-sensitive proteins in their hearts. When hit by a blue laser, the proteins open channels that cause a flow of ions or charged particles that cause the heart to beat.







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