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Alzheimer's and Dementia

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Medicine

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Neurology, AAN, American Academy Of Neurology, Journal Neurology, Diabetes, Dementia

Diabetes May Significantly Increase Your Risk of Dementia

People with diabetes appear to be at a significantly increased risk of developing dementia, according to a study published in the September 20, 2011, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Medicine

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alzheimer disease, Alzheimer, Dementia, Memory Loss

Nantz National Alzheimer Center Addresses Alzheimer’s Disease Myths

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World Alzheimer’s Day is Sept. 21, 2011. Dr. Gustavo C. Roman, director of the Nantz National Alzheimer Center at the Methodist Neurological Institute, addresses some common misconceptions about this devastating disease.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Medical Ethics, Ethics, Alzheimer's Risk Factors

Safeguards Needed to Prevent Alzheimer’s Discrimination

A new report from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania tackles the ethical and logistical challenges of safely and effectively communicating a diagnosis of pre-clinical Alzheimer's disease in light of the gulf between diagnosis and treatment.

Medicine

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Blood Brain Barrier, Alzheimer's

For Alzheimer’s, Multiple Sclerosis and Brain Cancers, Cornell Finding May Permit Drug Delivery to the Brain

Cornell University researchers may have solved a 100-year puzzle: How to safely open and close the blood-brain barrier.

Medicine

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American Academy Of Neurology, Neurology, Journal Neurology, AAN, Cholesterol

Study Reveals Link Between High Cholesterol and Alzheimer’s Disease

People with high cholesterol may have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study published in the September 13, 2011, issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Aerobic Exercise May Reduce the Risk of Dementia

Any exercise that gets the heart pumping may reduce the risk of dementia and slow the condition’s progression once it starts, reported a Mayo Clinic study published this month in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Researchers examined the role of aerobic exercise in preserving cognitive abilities and concluded that it should not be overlooked as an important therapy against dementia.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Cognitive Decline, Aging, Blocked Blood Vessels, Brain, Posture, shaking hands, Lesions

Signs of Aging May be Linked to Undetected Blocked Brain Blood Vessels

Many common signs of aging, such as shaking hands, stooped posture and walking slower, may be due to tiny blocked vessels in the brain that can’t be detected by current technology.

Medicine

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Neurons, Axons, Rac, Parkinson’s disease , ALS, Alzheimer’s disease, Nerve Growth Factor

Scientists Reveal New Survival Mechanism for Neurons

Nerve cells that regulate everything from heart muscle to salivary glands send out projections known as axons to their targets. By way of these axonal processes, neurons control target function and receive molecular signals from targets that return to the cell body to support cell survival. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have revealed a molecular mechanism that allows a signal from the target to return to the cell body and fulfill its neuron-sustaining mission.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia, Geriatrics, Gerontology

Alzheimer's Disease Expert

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center offers Alzheimer's Disease expert.

Medicine

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American Academy Of Neurology, Neurology Journal, Journal Neurology, AAN, Neurology

Study Identifies Chemical Changes in Brains of People at Risk for Alzheimer's Disease

A brain imaging scan identifies biochemical changes in the brains of normal people who might be at risk for Alzheimer’s disease, according to research published in the August 24, 2011, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.







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