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Alzheimer's and Dementia

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Medicine

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Dementia, ALS, Mayo Clinic

New Genetic Mutation is the Most Common Cause of Familial Forms of Frontotemporal Dementia and ALS

North American investigators led by neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida have found a genetic abnormality they say is the most common cause of two different but related familial forms of neurodegenerative disease — frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Medicine

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Frontotemporal Dementia, early-onset dementia, neuron death, Wnt signaling pathway, Neurodegeneration

Scientists Uncover Potential Target for Treating Common Form of Early-Onset Dementia

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UCLA scientists discovered that a key signaling pathway plays an important role in frontotemporal dementia and may offer a potential target for treatment of the devastating brain disorder, which accounts for one in four cases of early-onset dementia.

Science

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Alzheimer's Disease, Genetic Risk, Midlife, Neurodegenerative Disease

More Focus Needed on Early Markers of Alzheimer’s Disease

Results of a new study at the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggest that people in midlife who are at genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease might show subtle differences in the speed at which they process information compared to those who do not have particular genetic risk.

Medicine

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Neurology, AAN, American Academy Of Neurology, Journal Neurology, Diabetes, Dementia

Diabetes May Significantly Increase Your Risk of Dementia

People with diabetes appear to be at a significantly increased risk of developing dementia, according to a study published in the September 20, 2011, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Medicine

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alzheimer disease, Alzheimer, Dementia, Memory Loss

Nantz National Alzheimer Center Addresses Alzheimer’s Disease Myths

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World Alzheimer’s Day is Sept. 21, 2011. Dr. Gustavo C. Roman, director of the Nantz National Alzheimer Center at the Methodist Neurological Institute, addresses some common misconceptions about this devastating disease.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Medical Ethics, Ethics, Alzheimer's Risk Factors

Safeguards Needed to Prevent Alzheimer’s Discrimination

A new report from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania tackles the ethical and logistical challenges of safely and effectively communicating a diagnosis of pre-clinical Alzheimer's disease in light of the gulf between diagnosis and treatment.

Medicine

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Blood Brain Barrier, Alzheimer's

For Alzheimer’s, Multiple Sclerosis and Brain Cancers, Cornell Finding May Permit Drug Delivery to the Brain

Cornell University researchers may have solved a 100-year puzzle: How to safely open and close the blood-brain barrier.

Medicine

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American Academy Of Neurology, Neurology, Journal Neurology, AAN, Cholesterol

Study Reveals Link Between High Cholesterol and Alzheimer’s Disease

People with high cholesterol may have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study published in the September 13, 2011, issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Medicine

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Aerobic Exercise May Reduce the Risk of Dementia

Any exercise that gets the heart pumping may reduce the risk of dementia and slow the condition’s progression once it starts, reported a Mayo Clinic study published this month in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Researchers examined the role of aerobic exercise in preserving cognitive abilities and concluded that it should not be overlooked as an important therapy against dementia.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Cognitive Decline, Aging, Blocked Blood Vessels, Brain, Posture, shaking hands, Lesions

Signs of Aging May be Linked to Undetected Blocked Brain Blood Vessels

Many common signs of aging, such as shaking hands, stooped posture and walking slower, may be due to tiny blocked vessels in the brain that can’t be detected by current technology.







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