Feature Channels:

Quantum Mechanics

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Spintronics, Silicon Carbide, nuclear spins, Molecular Engineering, quantum technologies

Spintronics Advance Brings Wafer-Scale Quantum Devices Closer to Reality

ksogurziyf.19814.20150624.jpg

University of Chicago researchers have made a crucial step toward nuclear spintronic technologies. They have gotten nuclear spins to line themselves up in a consistent, controllable way, and they have done it using a high-performance material that is practical, convenient, and inexpensive.

Science

Channels:

International Collaboration, Nanoscience, Nanomaterials, Nanomaterial, Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Lab, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology, Quantum Computers, Quantum Computer, Nature Communications

Miniscule Mirrored Cavities Connect Quantum Memories

cfn-cotlet-lu-englund-nature-communications-large.jpg

Scientists built nanoscale mirrors to trap light around atoms inside of diamond crystals. The mirrored cavities allow light to bounce back and forth up to 10,000 times, enhancing the normally weak interaction between light and the electronic spin states in the atoms. As a result, a 200-microsecond spin-coherence time was produced. The enhanced interactions and extended spin-coherence times are essential steps toward realizing quantum computing systems to solve some problems faster than conventional systems.

Science

Channels:

2d electronics, 2D layered materials, resonant tunneling, quantum behavior

A Diode a Few Atoms Thick Shows Surprising Quantum Effect

I-Vcurves.jpg

A quantum mechanical transport phenomenon demonstrated for the first time in synthetic, atomically-thin layered material at room temperature could lead to novel nanoelectronic circuits and devices, according to researchers at Penn State and three other U.S. and international universities.

Science

Channels:

Quantum Dot, quantum dot glow, LED

What the Blank Makes Quantum Dots Blink?

QuantumDotNanocluster_1.png

Quantum dots promise an astounding range of applications, if scientists can conquer their annoying habit of blinking. Researchers computing at NERSC recently ran simulations that offer new insights into the problem.

Science

Channels:

Quantum Information, quantum communications, Teleportation, superdense teleportation, encoding information, Physics

Beam It Up Densely: Transporting Quantum Information Without Moving Matter

Wei2.jpg

A team of scientists have taken quantum teleportation – a method of communicating information from one location to another without having to physically move it – to a higher level by using certain high-dimensional states (which they dubbed “donut” states) for teleportation. Stony Brook University physicist Tzu-Chieh Wei, PhD, and colleagues nationally demonstrated that their method works, is more reliable than previous teleportation schemes, and could be a stepping stone toward building a quantum communications network. Their findings appear in Nature Communications.

Science

Channels:

Quantum, Physics, quantum simulation, superconductivity; cuprates; liquid crystal; electricity; atoms;

Moving Out of Equilibrium

portocoverconcept1-latt2-gallery-website-ps.png

JQI physicists, led by Trey Porto, are interested in quantum magnetic ordering, which is believed to be intimately related to high-temperature superconductivity and also has significance in other massively connected quantum systems. Recently, the group studied the magnetic and motional dynamics of atoms in a specially designed laser-based lattice that looks like a checkerboard. Their work was published in the journal Science.

Science

Channels:

Quantum Physics, Tomonaga, Luttinger, Liquid, Superfluid, Helium, Nanotechnology, Fluid

Quantum Physics on Tap

gervais_faucet_assembleddevice.png

Only recently has nanotechnology made it possible to reach the scale required to test the theoretical model known as the Tomonaga-Luttinger theory. Now, a team of researchers has succeeded in conducting experiments with the smallest channel yet.

Science

Channels:

Quantum Computers, Ion Traps, Chips, Qubits, quantum bits, Superposition, ball grid array, trench capacitors, Nicholas D. Guise, Spencer D. Fallek, Kelly E. Stevens, K. R. Brown, Curtis Volin, Alexa W. Harter, Jason M. Amini, Robert E. Higashi, Son Thai Lu, Helen M. Chanhvongsak, Thi A. Nguyen, Matthew S. Marcus, Thomas R. Ohnstein, Daniel W. Youngner, Georgia

New Chip Architecture May Provide Foundation for Quantum Computer

JAP-Guise-ballgridarray-BGAtrapphoto.png

In a paper appearing this week in the Journal of Applied Physics, a team of researchers at Georgia Tech Research Institute and Honeywell International have demonstrated a new device that allows more electrodes to be placed on a chip -- an important step that could help increase qubit densities and bring us one step closer to a quantum computer that can simulate molecules or perform other algorithms of interest.

Science

Channels:

magnetic monopoles, David S. Hall, Amherst College, Particle Physics, Quantum Physics

Amherst College Professor David Hall and Team Observe Quantum-Mechanical Monopoles

Amherst College professor David S. Hall and a team of collaborators have experimentally identified a pointlike monopole in a quantum field for the first time. The discovery gives scientists insight into the monopole magnet, an elementary particle that they believe exists but have not yet seen.

Science

Channels:

Imaging, MEMS, Sensor, Quantum, Microcantilever

ORNL Reports Method That Takes Quantum Sensing to New Level

2015-P01521.jpg

Thermal imaging, microscopy and ultra-trace sensing could take a quantum leap with a technique developed by researchers at ORNL.







Chat now!