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Medicine

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Migraine, Heart Attack

Migraine May Double Risk of Heart Attack

Migraine sufferers are twice as likely to have heart attacks as people without migraine, according to a new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University.

Medicine

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Clinical Guidelines, Back Pain

Usual Care Often Not Consistent With Clinical Guidelines for Low Back Pain

Australian general practitioners often treat patients with low back pain in a manner that does not appear to match the care endorsed by international clinical guidelines, according to a report in the February 8 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Medicine

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Chest Pain

Study Examines Course and Treatment of Unexplained Chest Pain

Fewer than half of individuals who have “non-specific” chest pain (not explained by a well-known condition) experience relief from symptoms following standard medical care, according to a report in the February 8 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. In addition, one-tenth of those with persistent chest pain undergo potentially unnecessary diagnostic testing.

Medicine

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Pain Medicine, Latino, Analgesics

Latino and White Children Might Receive Different Pain Treatment

Differences might exist in the amount of pain medicine given to Latino and white children after surgery, found a new, small study.

Medicine

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American Pain Society Annual Scientific Meeting, May 6-8, Baltimore

Journalists are cordially invited to cover proceedings of the 29th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Pain Society, May 6-8 at the Baltimore Convention Center.

Medicine

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Anesthesia, Anesthesiologist, Anesthesiology, Sedation, Intensive Care Unit, ICU, Monitoring, Critical Care, Orthopedic Surgery, oximetry probe, Postoperative, Surveillance, Heart Rate, physiological abnormalities

New Approach to Postsurgical Monitoring After Surgery Could Keep Patients Out of ICUs

A patient surveillance system implemented by anesthesiologists at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and presented in a study in the February Anesthesiology has proven to dramatically decrease the number of rescue calls and ICU transfers in postsurgical patients, allowing doctors to intervene in more cases before a crisis situation develops.

Medicine

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Mirror, mirror therapy, Phantom Limb Pain, Amputation, Soldiers, Combat Injuries, Anesthesia & Analgesia, International Anesthesia Research Society

Mirror Therapy Prevents Phantom Limb Pains in Injured Soldiers

A simple technique called mirror therapy seems effective in preventing phantom limb pain in patients undergoing amputation of an arm or leg, suggests a study in the February 2010 issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS).

Medicine

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Opioids, Addiction, Chronic Pain

Used as Prescribed, Opioids Relieve Chronic Pain With Little Addiction Risk

Taking opioids long term is associated with clinically significant pain relief in some patients with a very small risk of addition, a new review finds.

Medicine

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Propofol, Anesthesia, Delirium, Elderly, Sedation, Surgery

Lighter Sedation for Elderly During Surgery May Reduce Risk of Confusion, Disorientation After

A common complication following surgery in elderly patients is postoperative delirium, a state of confusion that can lead to long-term health problems and cause some elderly patients to complain that they “never felt the same” again after an operation. But a new study by Johns Hopkins researchers suggests that simply limiting the depth of sedation during procedures could safely cut the risk of postoperative delirium by 50 percent.

Medicine

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spinal anesthesia, geriatric patients, postoperative delirium

Decrease in Postoperative Delirium in Elderly Patients

A recent study, published in the January issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, demonstrates that in elderly patients undergoing hip fracture repair under spinal anesthesia with propofol sedation, the prevalence of delirium can be decreased by 50 percent with light sedation, compared to deep sedation.







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