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Science

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Enzyme, paleoenzymology, Gene, Reconstruction, Biofuels, Synthetic Biology, Computational Biology, Atomic Force Microscopy

Researchers Resurrect Four-Billion-Year-Old Enzymes, Reveal Conditions of Early Life on Earth

A team of scientists from Columbia University, Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Granada in Spain have successfully reconstructed active enzymes from four-billion-year-old extinct organisms. By measuring the properties of these enzymes, they could examine the conditions in which the extinct organisms lived. The results shed new light on how life has adapted to changes in the environment from ancient to modern Earth.

Science

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Stem Cells, pluripotent stem cells, Gene Therapy

Patient’s Own Cells May Hold Therapeutic Promise After Reprogramming, Gene Correction

Scientists from the Morgridge Institute for Research, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of California and the WiCell Research Institute moved gene therapy one step closer to clinical reality by determining that the process of correcting a genetic defect does not substantially increase the number of potentially cancer-causing mutations in induced pluripotent stem cells.

Medicine

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Prostate Cancer, Digoxin

Heart Drug Cuts Prostate Cancer Risk; Holds Potential for Therapeutic Use

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Johns Hopkins scientists and their colleagues paired laboratory and epidemiologic data to find that men using the cardiac drug, digoxin, had a 24 percent lower risk for prostate cancer. The scientists say further research about the discovery may lead to use of the drug, or new ones that work the same way, to treat the cancer.

Medicine

Science

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HIV, AIDS, Vaccine, HIV clade C, neutralizing human monoclonal antibody, proliferative T-cell responses, passive radio frequency identification, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Study Identifies Promising Target for AIDS Vaccine

A section of the AIDS virus's protein envelope once considered an improbable target for a vaccine now appears to be one of the most promising, new research by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists indicates.

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Fruit Fly's Response to Starvation Could Help Control Human Appetites

Biologists at UC San Diego have identified the molecular mechanisms triggered by starvation in fruit flies that enhance the nervous system’s response to smell, allowing these insects and presumably vertebrates—including humans—to become more efficient and voracious foragers when hungry. Their discovery of the neural changes that control odor-driven food searches in flies, which they detail in a paper in the April 1 issue of the journal Cell, could provide a new way to potentially regulate human appetite.

Science

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immune therapy, Fertility, Dr. Brij Saxena, Dr. Meirong Hao, D. Premila Rathnam

Immune Therapy Can Control Fertility in Mammals

Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College have shown that it is possible to immunize mammals to control fertility. They say their technique could possibly be used on other mammals -- including humans -- because fertility hormones and their receptors are species-non-specific and are similar in both females and males. For pets, the technique could be an alternative to castration and adverse effects of hormone administration.

Medicine

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Turner syndrome

Combination of Two Hormones Increases Height in Girls with Turner Syndrome

Giving girls with Turner syndrome low doses of estrogen, as well as growth hormone, years before the onset of puberty, increases their height and offers a wealth of other benefits, say a team of researchers led by Thomas Jefferson University. Their report is published in the March 31st issue of The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).

Science

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Common Lab Dye Is a Wonder Drug – for Worms

Basic Yellow 1, a dye used in neuroscience labs around the world, is a wonder drug for nematode worms. Thioflavin T extended lifespan in healthy worms by more than 50 percent and slowed the disease process in worms bred to mimic aspects of Alzheimer’s. The research could open new ways to intervene in aging and age-related disease.

Science

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Prosthetic, Prostheses, Pneumatics, Brain Activity, Amputees, amputated limbs, bio medical , Engineering

Students Invent Breakthrough Brain-Controlled Prosthetic Arm

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Two biomedical engineering students from Ryerson University invent prosthetic arm that is controlled by brain signals and powered by pneumatics.

Medicine

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Breast Cancer, nano drug, Cedars Sinai

New “Nanodrug” Breaks Down Barriers to Attack Breast Cancer Cells from the Inside Out

Unlike other drugs that target cancer cells from the outside with minimal effect, this “transport vehicle” carries multiple drugs that spare healthy cells, accumulate in tumor cells and strike cancer-specific molecular targets inside.







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