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Science

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Nanonails

With a Jolt, 'Nanonails' Go from Repellant to Wettable

Sculpting a surface composed of tightly packed nanostructures that resemble tiny nails, University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers and their colleagues from Bell Laboratories have created a material that can repel almost any liquid.

Science

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Nanotechnology, Electronics

Chemists Highly Pure Nanotubes Needed for Next Generation Electronic Devices

Chemists from UALR,and developed a procedure for creating highly pure carbon nanotubes needed for the development of the next generation of electronic devices. The discovery could break the scientific bottleneck keeping electronic devices from shrinking to the nanoscale .

Science

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Nanotechnology, Carbon, Nanotubes, Solar, Lighting, Efficiency, World, Record, Guinness, Book, Energy, Conversion

Researchers Develop Darkest Manmade Material

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Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Rice University have created the darkest material ever made by man. The material, a thin coating comprised of low-density arrays of loosely vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes, absorbs more than 99.9 percent of light and one day could be used to boost the effectiveness and efficiency of solar energy conversion, infrared sensors, and other devices.

Science

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Photolithography, Nanotechnology

Nanoscale Details of Photolithography Process Revealed

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Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made the first direct measurements of the infinitesimal expansion and collapse of thin polymer films used in the manufacture of advanced semiconductor devices. It's a matter of only a couple of nanometers, but it can be enough to affect the performance of next-generation chip manufacturing.

Science

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Nanotechnology, Materials

NIST Imaging System Maps Nanomechanical Properties

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The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed an imaging system that quickly maps the mechanical properties of materials"”how stiff or stretchy they are, for example"”at scales on the order of billionths of a meter.

Science

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Nanotechnology, Nanotech, Anthrax, Nature, NSF, NIH, Bioterrorism, Nanotubes, Biotechnology, Biotech, Engineering, Security, Cancer

Using Carbon Nanotubes To Seek and Destroy Anthrax Toxin and Other Harmful Proteins

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a new way to seek out specific proteins, including dangerous proteins such as anthrax toxin, and render them harmless using nothing but light. The technique lends itself to the creation of new antibacterial and antimicrobial films to help curb the spread of germs, and also holds promise for new methods of seeking out and killing tumors in the human body.

Science

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NEMS, Gallium Nitride, Q Factor

"˜High Q' Nanowires May be Practical Oscillators

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Nanowires grown at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have a mechanical "quality factor" at least 10 times higher than reported values for other nanoscale devices such as carbon nanotubes, and comparable to that of commercial quartz crystals.

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Nanotech's, Impacts

Nanotech's Health, Environment Impacts Worry Scientists

The unknown human health and environmental impacts of nanotechnology are a bigger worry for scientists than for the public, according to a new report published today (Nov. 25) in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

Science

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Buckyball, Birth, Observed, Sandia, Nanotech, Researcher

Buckyball Birth Observed by Sandia Nanotech Researcher

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Almost everyone in the scientific community has heard of buckyballs, but no one until Sandia's Jianyu Huang has seen one being born.

Medicine

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Nanotechnology, Biomedicine, Immune System, Proteins, Blood, Massachusetts

Nanomedicine Institute to Develop Tiny Tools for Medical Diagnostics

UMass Amherst is host to a new nanomedicine institute focused on developing super-tiny structures for biomedical research. Work will focus on engineering fluorescent nanostructures for tagging proteins, engineering magnetic nanoparticles to remove pathogens from blood; and developing biodegradable nanostructures for fighting the malaria parasite.







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