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Article ID: 567425

Wax, Soap Clean Up Obstacles to Better Batteries

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

A little wax and soap can help build electrodes for cheaper lithium ion batteries, according to a study in August 11 issue of Nano Letters. The one-step method will allow battery developers to explore lower-priced alternatives to the lithium ion-metal oxide batteries currently on the market.

Released:
12-Aug-2010 5:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 567293

Better Displays Ahead

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati Nanoelectronics Laboratory are actively pursuing an alternative approach for low-power displays and hope to provide details about what's ahead for display technology. Their assessment appears in the American Institute of Physics' Applied Physics Letters.

Released:
10-Aug-2010 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 567117

Unprecedented Look at Oxide Interfaces Reveals Unexpected Structures on Atomic Scale

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Thin layers of oxide materials and their interfaces have been observed in atomic resolution during growth for the first time by researchers at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, providing new insight into the complicated link between their structure and properties.

Released:
4-Aug-2010 2:50 PM EDT
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Article ID: 567091

NIST Nanofluidic 'Multi-Tool' Separates and Sizes Nanoparticles

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Following this guiding principle, NIST researchers have engineered a nanoscale fluidic device that functions as a miniature 'multi-tool' for working with nanoparticles-objects whose dimensions are measured in nanometers, or billionths of a meter.

Released:
4-Aug-2010 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 567081

Faster DNA Analysis at Room Temperature

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Researchers in Canada have combined DNA microarrays with microfluidic devices, which are used for the precise control of liquids at the nanoscale. An article in an upcoming issue of the journal Biomicrofluidics, describes how the first combined device can be used for sorting DNA.

Released:
3-Aug-2010 4:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 567003

New Catalyst of Platinum Nanoparticles Could Lead to Conk-Out Free, Stable Fuel Cells

Cornell University

In the quest for efficient, cost-effective and commercially viable fuel cells, scientists at Cornell University’s Energy Materials Center have discovered a catalyst and catalyst-support combination that could make fuel cells more stable, conk-out free, inexpensive and more resistant to carbon monoxide poisoning.

Released:
2-Aug-2010 10:35 AM EDT
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Article ID: 566989

Nano 'Pin Art': NIST Arrays are Step To Mass Produced Nanowires

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

NIST researchers have cultivated many thousands of nanocrystals in what looks like a pinscreen or "pin art" on silicon, a step toward reliable mass production of semiconductor nanowires for millionths-of-a-meter-scale devices such as sensors and lasers.

Released:
30-Jul-2010 4:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 566973

Kinked Nanopores Slow DNA Passage for Easier Sequencing

Sandia National Laboratories

Kinked nanopores and atomic-layer deposition enable fivefold slowdown in DNA studies, and also enable separation of single- and double-stranded DNA.

Released:
30-Jul-2010 1:45 PM EDT
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Nanotechnology

Article ID: 566884

Nanoblasts Move Molecules, Proteins & DNA into Cells

Georgia Institute of Technology, Research Communications

Using chemical “nanoblasts” that punch tiny holes in the protective membranes of cells, researchers have demonstrated a new technique for getting therapeutic small molecules, proteins and DNA directly into living cells.

Released:
27-Jul-2010 4:35 PM EDT
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Article ID: 566869

Humble Protein, Nanoparticles Tag-Team to Kill Cancer Cells

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A normally benign protein found in the human body appears to be able – when paired with nanoparticles – to zero in on and kill certain cancer cells, without having to also load those particles with chemotherapy drugs. The finding could lead to a new strategy for targeted cancer therapies, according to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill scientists who made the discovery.

Released:
27-Jul-2010 1:30 PM EDT
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