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Science

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Nanotechnology, Nanotech, Anthrax, Nature, NSF, NIH, Bioterrorism, Nanotubes, Biotechnology, Biotech, Engineering, Security, Cancer

Using Carbon Nanotubes To Seek and Destroy Anthrax Toxin and Other Harmful Proteins

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a new way to seek out specific proteins, including dangerous proteins such as anthrax toxin, and render them harmless using nothing but light. The technique lends itself to the creation of new antibacterial and antimicrobial films to help curb the spread of germs, and also holds promise for new methods of seeking out and killing tumors in the human body.

Science

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NEMS, Gallium Nitride, Q Factor

"˜High Q' Nanowires May be Practical Oscillators

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Nanowires grown at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have a mechanical "quality factor" at least 10 times higher than reported values for other nanoscale devices such as carbon nanotubes, and comparable to that of commercial quartz crystals.

Science

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Nanotech's, Impacts

Nanotech's Health, Environment Impacts Worry Scientists

The unknown human health and environmental impacts of nanotechnology are a bigger worry for scientists than for the public, according to a new report published today (Nov. 25) in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

Science

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Buckyball, Birth, Observed, Sandia, Nanotech, Researcher

Buckyball Birth Observed by Sandia Nanotech Researcher

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Almost everyone in the scientific community has heard of buckyballs, but no one until Sandia's Jianyu Huang has seen one being born.

Medicine

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Nanotechnology, Biomedicine, Immune System, Proteins, Blood, Massachusetts

Nanomedicine Institute to Develop Tiny Tools for Medical Diagnostics

UMass Amherst is host to a new nanomedicine institute focused on developing super-tiny structures for biomedical research. Work will focus on engineering fluorescent nanostructures for tagging proteins, engineering magnetic nanoparticles to remove pathogens from blood; and developing biodegradable nanostructures for fighting the malaria parasite.

Science

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Nanowire, Electronics

Researchers Demo Industrial-Grade Nanowire Device Fabrication

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Before you can buy nanometer-scale wires at your local Nano Depot, manufacturers will need efficient, reliable methods to build them in quantity. Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) believe they have a solution.

Science

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Nanotechnology, Nanotech, Semiconductors, Advanced, Materials, Sensors, Nanotubes, Packaging, Engineering

The Sensitive Side of Carbon Nanotubes: Creating Powerful Pressure Sensors

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Blocks of carbon nanotubes can be used to create effective and powerful pressure sensors, according to a new study by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Taking advantage of the material's unique electrical and mechanical properties, researchers repeatedly squeezed a 3-millimeter nanotube block and discovered it was highly suitable for potential applications as a pressure sensor.

Science

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Solar, Biomedical, Microelectronics

Engineering Expert's "˜Nanospikes' Add New Dimension to Solar, Biomedical, Microelectronics Research

New technology in development at the University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science could lead to more successful hip and bone replacement surgeries, make better use of solar power and even prevent your computer from overheating.

Science

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Ruthenium, Semiconductors, Nanotechnology

Researchers Shed Light on Light-emitting Nanodevice

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An interdisciplinary team of Cornell nanotechnology researchers has unraveled some of the fundamental physics of a material that holds promise for light-emitting, flexible semiconductors.

Science

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Nanotechnology, Evanescent Waves, Optics, Georgia Tech, Georgia Institute Of Technology, Heat Transfer, Radiation

Taming Tiny, Unruly Waves for Nano Optics

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Nanoscale devices present a unique challenge to any optical technology "” there's just not enough room for light to travel in a straight line. Waves become unstable and difficult to predict, making design of devices using this technology difficult. But Georgia Tech researchers have discovered a method of predicting the behavior of light on the nanoscale during radiation heat transfer, opening the door to the design of a spectrum of new nanodevices and technologies.







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