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Making Nanowires More Electrically Stable

Carmen Lilley, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, has won an NSF CAREER Award which will assist her in developing new procedures to ensure that microscopic wires used in nano-scale devices are electrically stable.

Science

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Nanotube, Nanowire, Friction, Assembly

Friction Differences Offer New Tool in Carbon Nanotubes

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Publishing in the journal Nature Materials, researchers report measuring different friction forces when a carbon nanotube slides along its axis compared to when it slides perpendicular to its axis. The observation could provide a new tool for assembling and sorting nanotubes.

Medicine

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Burns, second-degree burns, Nanoemulsion

Nanotech Treatment for Burns Curbs Infection, Inflammation

Treating second-degree burns with a nanoemulsion lotion sharply curbs bacterial growth and reduces inflammation that otherwise can jeopardize recovery, University of Michigan scientists have shown in laboratory studies. The results are reported today at the Interscience Conference for Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

Science

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Carbon Nanotubes, Solar Cell, Solar Power

Carbon Nanotubes Could Make Efficient Solar Cells

Using a carbon nanotube instead of traditional silicon, Cornell researchers have created the basic elements of a solar cell that hopefully will lead to much more efficient ways of converting light to electricity than now used in calculators and on rooftops.

Medicine

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University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences, Vladimir Zharov, Nanomedicine, Nanoparticle, Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute, cancer metastasis, Tumors, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering , UAMS, Laura Hutchins

Researcher Receives $2.3 Million in Nanomedicine Grants to Treat and Prevent Lethal Cancer Metastasis

A University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) researcher on the cutting edge of nanotechnology has been awarded $2.3 million in three grants to further groundbreaking developments in the prevention of lethal cancer metastasis and take his team’s findings to the first clinical trial of its kind.

Science

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Nanotechnology, Multi Disciplinary, Nanoscience

Nano Research Has Strong Multidisciplinary Roots

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Research reported in the September issue of the journal Nature Nanotechnology finds that nanoscience and nanotechnology are highly multidisciplinary – but not much more so than other modern disciplines such as medicine or electrical engineering that also draw on multiple areas of science and technology.

Science

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Graphene, Nano-material, Spintronics

Researchers Design New Graphene-based, Nano-material with Magnetic Properties

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An international team of researchers has designed a new graphite-based, magnetic nano-material that acts as a semiconductor and could help material scientists create the next generation of electronic devices like microchips.

Science

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Nanotechnology, NSF

NSF Funds Nanoscale Research

Northeastern University’s Nanoscale Science and Engineering Research Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) has received a $12.25 million renewal grant from the National Science Foundation to continue its industry-leading research: translating nanoscale scientific processes into commercially viable technologies.

Science

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microfluidic arrays, Lego, Nanotechnology

LEGO Toy Helps Researchers Learn What Happens on Nanoscale

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Johns Hopkins engineers are using a popular children’s toy to visualize the behavior of particles, cells and molecules in environments too small to see with the naked eye. These researchers are arranging little LEGO pieces shaped like pegs to re-create microscopic activity taking place inside lab-on-a-chip devices at a scale they can more easily observe.

Medicine

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Researchers Use Golden Nanotubes for Imaging Agent to Detect Tumor Cells, Map Sentinel Lymph Node

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Biomedical researchers at the University of Arkansas and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock have developed a special contrast-imaging agent that is capable of molecular mapping of lymphatic endothelial cells and detecting cancer metastasis in sentinel lymph nodes. The new material could be used as a more efficient and less toxic alternative to nanoparticles and fluorescent labels used in the non-invasive, targeted molecular detection of normal cells, such as immune-related cells, and abnormal cells, such as cancer cells and bacteria.







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