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Science

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Nanotechnology, Nanotubes, Bile Acid, Self Assembly

'Two-Faced' Bioacids Put a New Face on Carbon Nanotube Self-Assembly

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Researchers from NIST and Rice University have demonstrated a simple, inexpensive way to induce carbon nanotubes to 'self-assemble' in long, regular strands, a useful technique for studying nanotube properties and potentially a new way to assemble nanotube-based devices

Science

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Nanotechnology, Gas Sensor, Metal Oxide Nanotube, Chemical Sensors

Super Sensitive Gas Detector Goes Down the Nanotubes

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NIST researchers have devised a new method to cast arrays of metal oxide nanotubes to create novel gas sensors that are a hundred to 1,000 times more sensitive than current devices based on thin films.

Medicine

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Nanomedicine, Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, Neurodegenerative Disorders, Nerve Growth Factor, Pc12 Cells

Special Nanotubes May Be Used as a Vehicle for Treating Neurodegenerative Disorders

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Electrical engineering researchers at the University of Arkansas have demonstrated that magnetic nanotubes combined with nerve growth factor can enable specific cells to differentiate into neurons. The results from in vitro studies show that magnetic nanotubes may be exploited to treat neurodegenerative disorders.

Science

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Nanotube, Nanotechnology, Cornell, Dupont, Transistors, Solar Cells

Carbon Nanotube "˜Ink' May Lead to Thinner, Lighter Transistors and Solar Cells

Using a simple chemical process, scientists at Cornell and DuPont have invented a method of preparing carbon nanotubes for suspension in a semiconducting "ink," which can then be printed into such thin, flexible electronics as transistors and photovoltaic materials.

Science

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Nanoscale, Nanomanufacturing

Researchers Develop Rapid Assembly Process in Nanoscale

Research conducted at the National Science Foundation (NSF) Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) by the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Northeastern University led to the development of rapid template-assisted assembly of polymer blends in the nanoscale. The research team created a highly effective process that takes only 30 seconds to complete and does not require annealing.

Science

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Nanotechnology, Nanoparticles, C Dots, Molecular Imaging

Researchers Create Smaller, Brighter Probe, Tailored for Clinical Molecular Imaging and Tumor Targeting

Researchers have developed a new generation of microscopic particles for molecular imaging, constituting one of the first promising nanoparticle platforms that may be readily adapted for tumor targeting and treatment in the clinic.

Medicine

Channels:

Nanomedicine, Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, Biomedicine, Biosensors

Nanomedicine: Researchers Publish First Textbook of Emerging Field

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Engineering researchers at the University of Arkansas have published the first textbook on the emerging field of nanomedicine.

Science

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Nanotechnology, Health, Smart Clothing

Nature, Nanotechnology Fuse in Electric Yarn That Detects Blood

A carbon nanotube-coated "smart yarn" that conducts electricity could be woven into soft fabrics that detect blood and monitor health, engineers at the University of Michigan have demonstrated.

Science

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Furniture, Upholstery, Fire Prevention, Fire Retardants, Nanotechnology

Carbon Nanofibers Cut Flammability of Upholstered Furniture

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Carbon, the active ingredient in charcoal, is normally not considered a fire retardant, but researchers at NIST have determined that adding a small amount of carbon nanofibers to the polyurethane foams used in some upholstered furniture can reduce flammability by about 35 percent when compared to foam infused with conventional fire retardants.

Medicine

Channels:

Virus Esdma, Biotechnology, Nanotechnology

Dressed to Kill: From Virus to Vaccine

Researchers at NIST and the University of Queensland have demonstrated that they can count, size and gauge the quality of virus-like particle-based vaccines much more quickly and accurately than previously possible. Their findings could reduce the time it takes to produce a vaccine from months to weeks, allowing a much more agile and effective response to potential outbreaks.







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