Feature Channels:

Nanotechnology

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Nanoparticle, AAPM, Cancer Killing Isotopes

Presentation at AAPM Meeting on Nanoparticles That Package Cancer-killing Isotopes and Deliver Them Into Cancer Cells

A group of researchers at Johns Hopkins University has designed nanoparticles that can carry cancer-treating radioisotopes through the body and deliver them selectively to tumors. Today in Anaheim, CA, they will report the latest results of their research, including studies in animal models, at the 51st meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM).

Medicine

Science

Channels:

X Ray Vision, Nanotechnology

Teeny-tiny X-Ray Vision

The tubes that power X-ray machines are shrinking, improving the clarity and detail of their Superman-like vision. A team of nanomaterial scientists, medical physicists, and cancer biologists at the University of North Carolina has developed new lower-cost X-ray tubes packed with sharp-tipped carbon nanotubes for cancer research and treatment.

Science

Channels:

Nanotechnology, Cancer, Biotechnology, Quantum Dots, Materials Science

All-In-One Nanoparticle: A Swiss Army Knife for Nanomedicine

For the first time researchers have combined nanoparticles used for medical imaging and therapy in a single tiny package.

Science

Channels:

Nanotechnology, Electron Microscopes, Commercialization

Canada Gains New Research and Product Development Centre for Nanotechnology

Canada's National Institute for Nanotechnology will soon be home to a new electron microscopy research and product development centre. The Hitachi Electron Microscopy Products Development Centre (HEMiC) at the National Institute for Nanotechnology (NINT) in Edmonton Alberta is a $14 million project supported the Canadian and Alberta governments, the University of Alberta and Hitachi High Technologies Inc.

Science

Channels:

Nanotechnology, Nanostructure, Nanoscience, Statistics, Experiment, Error

Statistical Technique Improves Nanotechnology Data

spar89.jpg

A new statistical analysis technique that identifies and removes systematic bias, noise and equipment-based artifacts from experimental data could lead to more precise and reliable measurement of nanomaterials and nanostructures likely to have future industrial applications.

Medicine

Channels:

Nanotechnology, Material Science, salt, Physics, Physical Science

Salt Block Unexpectedly Stretches in Sandia Experiments

To stretch a supply of salt generally means using it sparingly. But researchers from Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Pittsburgh were startled when they found they had made the solid actually physically stretch.

Science

Channels:

ORNL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Ferroelectronics, Electronics, Material Science, Nanoscale Science, Nanophase Material Science

Finding Could Help Electronics Industry Enter New Phase

Electronic devices of the future could be smaller, faster, more powerful and consume less energy because of a discovery by researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Science

Channels:

Nanocrystals, Solar, Cells, Thermoelectric, Devices, Semiconductors

New "˜Electronic Glue' Promises Cheaper Semiconductors

Nanocrystals.jpg

Researchers at the University of Chicago have developed an "electronic glue" that could accelerate advances in semiconductor-based technologies, including solar cells and thermoelectric devices that convert sun light and waste heat, respectively, into useful electrical energy.

Science

Channels:

Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, Nanoparticle, Nanofilm, Nanocrystal

Researchers Create Freestanding Nanoparticle Films without Fillers

20090604DD009.jpg

Vanderbilt physicists have found a way to make nanoparticle films without additives that don't disintegrate at the slightest touch.

Science

Channels:

Nanotechnology, DNA, Molecules, Origami, drug, Delivery, System, dana, Farber, Cancer

Scientists Create Custom Three-dimensional Structures with "DNA Origami"

By combining the art of origami with nanotechnology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers have folded sheets of DNA into multilayered objects with dimensions thousands of times smaller than the thickness of a human hair. These tiny structures could be forerunners of custom-made biomedical nanodevices that would deliver drugs directly into patients' cells.







Chat now!