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Science

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Nanotube, Optical, Exciton, Quantum

Longer is Better for Nanotube Optical Properties

NIST researchers have shown that length has a significant impact on enhancing the optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Normally, material properties are constants, but, say the NIST researchers, at the nanoscale sometimes size matters in unusual ways.

Medicine

Channels:

Titanium, Nanowire, Bioscaffolds, Stents, Sterile, Nanopores

Nanowire Coating for Bone Implants, Stents

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University of Arkansas researchers develop nanowire scaffolds with applications in bone replacement and stents as well as hospital settings.

Science

Channels:

Nanotoxicology, Nanohorns, nano, Nanotubes, Pulmonary

New Nanotoxicology Study Delivers Promising Results

Findings by a team of researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee bode well for using single-walled carbon nanohorns, a particular form of engineered carbon-based nanoparticles, for drug delivery and other commercial applications.

Science

Channels:

Nanotechnology, Nanobiotechnology, Biodetection, Resonators, Lab On A Chip

Side-to-side Shaking of Nanoresonators Throws Off Impurities

Cornell researchers have demonstrated a new way to make nanoscale resonators vibrate 'in the plane' -- that is, side to side -- and have shown that this can improve biodetection by shaking off extraneous stuff that isn't supposed to be detected.

Science

Channels:

Nanotechnology, Nanostructure, Self Assembly, Copolymer, University, Delaware, Pochan, Washington, University, Wooley, Materials, Science, Engineering, NSF, Micelle, drug, Delivery, Signal, Communication, Radiology

Scientists Train Nano-'Building Blocks' to Take on New Shapes

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Researchers from the University of Delaware and Washington University in St. Louis have figured out how to train synthetic polymer molecules to behave--to literally "self-assemble" --and form into long, multicompartment cylinders 1,000 times thinner than a human hair, with potential uses in radiology, signal communication and the delivery of therapeutic drugs in the human body.

Science

Channels:

Hydrogen, Argonne National Laboratory, Nanotechnology, Fuel Cells

Nanotechnology Helps Make Bendy Sensors for Hydrogen Vehicles

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Recently, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have used their insights into nanomaterials to create bendy hydrogen sensors, which are at the heart of hydrogen fuel cells used in hydrogen vehicles.

Science

Channels:

Nanotechnology, Nanoscience, Nanowires

Scientists Discover New Way to Study Nanostructures

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Physicists at Georgia Tech have discovered a phenomenon which allows measurement of the mechanical motion of nanostructures by using the AC Josephson effect. The findings may be used to identify and characterize structural and mechanical properties of nanoparticles, including materials of biological interest.

Science

Channels:

Nanoparticles, Nanoconfinement, Polymers

Nanothin Sheet of Material Displays Unexpected Strength

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Scientists at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory have discovered the surprising strength of a sheet of nanoparticles that measures just 50 atoms in thickness.

Science

Channels:

Nanotechnology, Surface Chemistry, Molecular Dynamics

Nano Propellers Pump with Proper Chemistry

Chemists at the University of Illinois at Chicago have created a theoretical blueprint for assembling a nanoscale propeller with molecule-sized blades.

Science

Channels:

Nanotechnology, Nanotech, Materials, Science, Carbon, Nanotubes

Tough Tubes: Carbon Nanotubes Endure Heavy Wear and Tear

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The ability of carbon nanotubes to withstand repeated stress yet retain their structural and mechanical integrity is similar to the behavior of soft tissue, according to a new study from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. When paired with the strong electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes, this ability to endure wear and tear, or fatigue, suggests the materials could be used to create structures that mimic artificial muscles or interesting electro-mechanical systems, researchers said.







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