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Medicine

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Bacteria Use Traffic-Cop-Like Mechanism to Infect Gut

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WSU scientists discover mechanism critical to pathogens' success.

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Algae Use Their 'Tails' to Gallop and Trot Like Quadrupeds

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Long before there were fish swimming in the oceans, tiny microorganisms were using long slender appendages called cilia and flagella to navigate their watery habitats. Now, new research reveals that species of single-celled algae coordinate their flagella to achieve a remarkable diversity of swimming gaits.

Medicine

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When It Comes to Spring Allergies, Oak Pollen More Potent Than Pine; Food Allergies of Low-Income Kids Are Poorly Managed; Flowers Not to Blame for Allergies, and More in the Allergies Channel

When It Comes to Spring Allergies, Oak Pollen More Potent Than Pine; Food Allergies of Low-Income Kids Are Poorly Managed; Flowers Not to Blame for Allergies, and More in the Allergies Channel

Medicine

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Cancer, Fanconi Anemia, genes, FA genes, UT Southwestwen, BRCA2, FANCS, FANCD1

UT Southwestern Team Identifies New Function of Genes Linked to Fanconi Anemia and Certain Types of Cancer

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Researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified an important new function of genes in the Fanconi anemia pathway – a finding that could have implications for development of new therapies to treat this disorder and some cancers.

Medicine

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American Association of Neurological Surgeons, AANS Annual Scientific Meeting, Mesenchymal Stem Cell , Bone Marrow Cell Therapy, Hemorrhagic Stroke

Intraventricular Transplantation of Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell in Hemorrhagic Stroke

This research investigates the role of intraventricular transplantation using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell in stroke patients.

Medicine

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First Structural Views of the NMDA Receptor in Action Will Aid Drug Development

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Structural biologists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and Janelia Research Campus/HHMI, have obtained snapshots of the activation of an important type of brain-cell receptor. Dysfunction of the receptor has been implicated in a range of neurological illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, seizure, schizophrenia, autism, and injuries related to stroke.

Medicine

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Sensitivity to Cancer Drugs, Sensitive Cells, Cancer Cells, Cancer

Measuring Up

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Harvard Medical School scientists have developed an improved method for quantifying how sensitive cells are to cancer drugs. The approach works by zeroing in on an important characteristic that current methods do not take into account: the varying rates at which cells divide. The research team, led by Peter Sorger, the Otto Krayer Professor of Systems Pharmacology at HMS and head of the Harvard Program in Therapeutic Science, published its findings May 2 in Nature Methods.

Medicine

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Quieting Cells' Low-Oxygen Alarm Stops Flare-Ups in Rare Bone Disorder

The cellular response to the lack of oxygen fans the flames of flare-ups in a rare bone disorder. In fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a mutation triggers bone growth in muscles, which limits motion, breathing, and swallowing, among a host of progressive symptoms. The study identifies HIF-1α as a therapeutic target for stopping the extra bone growth in FOP and other disorders.

Medicine

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T Cells, Vaccines, Anitbody, Pathogens

LJI Scientists Discover Molecular Mechanism for Generating Specific Antibody Responses to Pathogens

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LA JOLLA, CA—Follicular helper T cells (Tfh cells), a rare type of T cells, are indispensible for the maturation of antibody-producing B cells. They promote the proliferation of B cells that produce highly selective antibodies against invading pathogens while weeding out those that generate potentially harmful ones. In their latest study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology identified a key signal that drives the commitment of immature Tfh cells into fully functional Tfh cells and thus driving the step-by-step process that results in a precisely tailored and effective immune response.

Medicine

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HPV Infection Can Be Identified in Self-Collected Vaginal Swabs

High risk, potentially cancer causing human papillomavirus infections are common among women in Papua New Guinea. But self sampling with vaginal swabs may provide materials that screen as accurately as the more labor-intensive approach using cervical samples obtained by clinicians. This finding is critical to developing same day screening and treatment, which is key to ensuring that women with precancerous lesions are treated in this largely unconnected (electronically) country, and in others like it. The research appeared online April 13, 2016 in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology, which is published by the American Society for Microbiology.







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