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Medicine

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Coronary Artery Disease, Antidepressants, psychotropic medication, Women

Correlational Study Shows Link Between Psychotropic Medication and Cardiac Events

Women with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) who report taking antidepressant and anti-anxiety medications have an increased risk of cardiovascular events, including heart attacks and strokes, and death compared to women not taking these medications.

Medicine

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CRP, Inflammation, Statin, Heart Disease, Cholesterol, Ldl Cholesterol, Jupiter, Heart Attack And Stroke, Atherosclerosis, C Reactive Protein, Prevention, Jacc, American College Of Cardiology, Ballantyne

Patients with High CRP and Normal LDL Have Long-Term Risk for Heart Disease, Stroke and Death

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New research shows a long-term benefit in screening people for CRP, a marker for inflammation, even if they have normal levels of bad cholesterol, because of increased long-term risk for heart attack, stroke and death.

Medicine

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Sleep Apnea, Kidney Transplant, High Blood Pressure, Sleep Disorder, Heart Disease, Stroke

Sleep Apnea May Cause Heart Disease in Kidney Transplant Patients

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Sleep apnea is common in individuals who receive a kidney transplant and is associated with increased risk of high blood pressure, heart disease or stroke, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society Nephrology (CJASN). Researchers found that kidney transplant patients are just as likely to have this sleep disorder as dialyzed kidney disease patients who are on the transplant waiting list. Therefore, both types of patients who have sleep apnea should be considered at high risk for developing serious heart-related complications.

Medicine

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Cardiovascular

Sculpture of Legendary Michigan Football Coach Bo Schembechler Unveiled

A bronze sculpture of Michigan football coach Bo Schembechler will be unveiled Nov. 19 at the U-M Cardiovascular Center. Long after Schembechler led the U-M football team to prominence, he was working tirelessly to do the same for heart health.

Medicine

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Heart Failure, Sodium calcium exchanger, center for translational medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, NCX1

Overexpression of Sodium/Calcium Exchanger Protein Alone did not Cause Heart Failure

Researchers from the Center for Translational Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University have found that the overexpression of a sodium/calcium exchanger, without changes in other ion transport pathways commonly observed in heart failure, does not by itself lead to contraction abnormalities in the heart. They presented the data from the study at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Orlando, Fla.

Medicine

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Atherosclerosis, Heart Disease, Cardiovascular

Egyptian Mummies Reveal Heart Disease as Ancient Affliction

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A new study finds that atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries, was common in ancient Egyptians, challenging a belief that vascular disease is a modern affliction caused by current-day risk factors such as stress and sedentary lifestyles.

Medicine

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Cardiology, Heart Disease In Women, Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Women Suffering Sudden Cardiac Arrest Have Lower Prevalence of Structural Heart Disease Compared to Men

New findings from the Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study show women don’t exhibit signs that would make them eligible for current treatments to prevent fatal cardiac arrest.

Medicine

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Transcendental Meditation, Coronary Heart Disease

Heart Disease Patients Who Practice Transcendental Meditation Have Nearly 50% Lower Rates of Heart Attack, Stroke, and Death

Results of first-ever study to be presented at annual meeting of the American Heart Association in Orlando, Nov. 16.

Medicine

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Schizophrenia, severe mental disorders, Psychotic, Mental Illness, Heart Disease

Heart Disease a ‘Silent Killer’ in Patients With Severe Mental Illness

A large new study confirms that people with severe mental disorders are 25 percent to 40 percent more prone to die from heart disease than people without mental illness are.

Medicine

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Phosphorus, Heart Disease, Coronary Arteries, Coronary Artery Calcification, Kidney

Small Increases in Phosphorus Mean Higher Risk of Heart Disease

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Higher levels of phosphorus in the blood are linked to increased calcification of the coronary arteries— a key marker of heart disease risk, according to a study in an upcoming issue of Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). "This may help to explain why even early-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk that is not otherwise explained by traditional risk factors," comments Katherine R. Tuttle, MD (Providence Medical Research Center, Spokane, WA).







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