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Medicine

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Hostility, Heart Disease, Women And Heart Disease, Women Only Study

Outwardly Expressed Anger Affects Some Women's Heart Arteries

Researchers seeking to improve diagnostic and treatment tools for women with heart disease have found that the outward expression of anger and hostility is higher in certain women with suspected coronary artery disease. But anger and hostility also are associated with atypical cardiac symptoms in women who do not have angiographic evidence of heart disease.

Medicine

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Cardiac Biomarker, Cardiovascular Events, Heart Disease

Elevated Level of Certain Cardiac Biomarker May Help Predict Risk of Cardiovascular Events

A blood test for patients with coronary heart disease could help predict their risk for subsequent cardiovascular events or death, according to a study in the January 10 issue of JAMA.

Medicine

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Folic Acid, Vitamin B, Cardiovascular Disease, Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, Bazzano, Tulane

Vitamin B Supplements Do Not Appear to Reduce Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

Contrary to previous studies, folic acid, a B vitamin, does not decrease the risk of coronary heart disease or stroke for people with a history of vascular disease, according to an article published by Tulane University researchers in the Dec. 13 issue of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Medicine

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Cardiology, Heart Disease, Prevention

Reducing Risk Factors May Not Change Overall Heart Disease Picture

Coronary heart disease is a leading killer in the United States and there has been a big push to get people to lower their risk. But a new review casts doubt on whether large-scale interventions to reduce multiple cardiac risk factors really work.

Medicine

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Stroke, Heart, Attack, Mortality, Statins, Cholesterol, Cartoid, Arterial, Disease

Statins Reduce Risk of Stroke in Heart Patients

Statins can significantly reduce the incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), or all-cause death in patients with severe carotid arterial disease not revascularized, according to a new study presented at CHEST 2006, the 72nd annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP).

Medicine

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Statistics, Hospital, Inpatient, data, HCUP, NIS

Heart Disease Consistently the Most Common Reasons for Hospitalizing the Elderly

Cardiac-related conditions such as congestive heart failure, hardening of the arteries, heart beat irregularities, and heart attack still account for four of the five most common principal diagnoses for hospitalizing elderly patients.

Medicine

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Infection, Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Disease, Inflammation, Genetics, Genetics

Could an Infection Break Your Heart?

A new study at Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research is looking for genetic factors that increase our susceptibility to some of this country's most common chronic infections, and ultimately, how that susceptibility might be linked to our risk for cardiovascular disease.

Medicine

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Angina, Heart Disease In Women, Chest Pain In Women

Sister, Can You Spare a Million? Study Says Chest Pain Toll in Women Is More than Physical

Considering both direct and indirect costs, the financial burden on a woman who has chest pain and blocked coronary arteries may total more than $1 million during her lifetime. But even a woman who suffers from angina without an obstruction can expect her condition to take a toll in the neighborhood of $800,000, according to a report in the Aug. 29 issue of Circulation.

Science

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Genetics, Genetics, Behavior, Physical, Traits, Personality, Biostatistics

Type A Personality Is Not Linked to Heart Disease in Large Study

Although human genes contribute significantly to a person's health and behavior, these two kinds of traits aren't closely linked at all.

Medicine

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Harvard Medical School, Harvard Heart Letter, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Heart Attack, Stroke, Heart Surgery

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Can Afflict Those Battling Heart Disease

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) isn't limited to soldiers or witnesses of a horrifying event. It can also appear after a heart attack, a stroke, or heart surgery. Not only does PTSD cause emotional and psychological distress, it may also slow recovery and hasten the progression of heart disease, reports the August issue of the Harvard Heart Letter.







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