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Heart Disease

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Medicine

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Daily Aspirin, Heart Attach, Clot Related Strokes, Heart Attack

An Aspirin a Day to Help Keep Heart Disease Away

Aspirin, long known to relieve fevers, aches and pain, has served an increasingly bigger role in health care in recent years. A daily aspirin may help lower the risk of heart attack and clot-related strokes.

Medicine

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Harvard Medical School, Harvard Men's Health Watch, Exercise, Vitamins, Supplements, Cancer, Heart Disease

Exercise Trumps Vitamins for Heart Disease, Cancer Prevention

Most experts agree that supplements add little, if anything, to a well-balanced diet. Exercise, however, is proven to achieve the benefits claimed for vitamins, even for people who eat properly, reports the November 2007 issue of Harvard Men's Health Watch.

Medicine

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Heart, Disease, Attack, Arteries, Cardiology, Sibling, and, Family, Heart, Study

Oh Brother: Family Ties Determine Who Gets Heart Disease

The genetic family ties that bind brothers and sisters also link their risk for developing clogged arteries and having potentially fatal heart attacks, scientists at Johns Hopkins report. And according to researchers, brothers bear the brunt of the burden.

Medicine

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Heart Disease, Cholesterol, Atherosclerosis, Arterial Plaques

Role of a Key Enzyme in Reducing Heart Disease Identified

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Virginia Commonwealth University researchers have identified the role of a key enzyme called CEH in reducing heart disease, paving the way for new target therapies to reduce plaques in the arteries and perhaps in the future, help predict a patient's susceptibility to heart disease.

Medicine

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Harvard Medical School, Harvard Mental Health Letter, Schizophrenia, Heart Disease

People with Schizophrenia More Likely to Die of Heart Disease

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and it's about twice as deadly for people with schizophrenia. The November 2007 issue of the Harvard Mental Health Letter looks at why the risk is so great for people with schizophrenia and what can they do to reduce it.

Medicine

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Heart Disease, Mental Health, Life Expectancy, Psychiatric Illness, Premature Death

Severely Mentally Ill at High Risk for Cardiovascular Disease

A psychiatrist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis writes in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) that although mortality from cardiovascular disease has declined in the United States over the past several decades, patients with severe psychiatric illness are not enjoying the benefits of that progress.

Medicine

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Coronary Heart Disease, Apolipoprotein, HDL, LDL, Chinese

Improving Assessment of Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Chinese

Scientists report that the concentration of a compound called apolipoprotein B in the blood is better at predicting whether Chinese have coronary heart disease "“ in which fatty deposits clog arteries that supply blood and oxygen to the heart "“ than other substances such as blood cholesterol levels.

Medicine

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Atherosclerosis, Transthyretin, Apolipoprotein

Slowing Down the Development of Heart Disease

Scientists have shown that a protein that is present in the blood may accelerate the development of atherosclerosis.

Medicine

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Job Strain, Heart Attack, Coronary Heart Disease

Chronic Job Strain After Heart Attack Associated With Increased Risk For Another Coronary Heart Disease Event

Persons who reported chronic job strain after a first heart attack (myocardial infarction) had about twice the risk of experiencing another coronary heart disease event such as heart attack or unstable angina than those without chronic job strain, according to a study in the October 10 issue of JAMA.

Medicine

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Coronary, Artery, Disease

Small Vessel Heart Disease: Mostly a Concern for Women

Coronary artery disease may take a different course in men and women, which may explain why the rate of death for women has declined more slowly than for men, according to the October issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter.







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