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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Mar-2010 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 562201

Researchers Identify Gene that May Play Role in Atherosclerosis

Georgia Institute of Technology, Research Communications

A new study suggests that a gene called HuR plays a critical role in inducing and mediating an inflammatory response in cells experiencing mechanical and chemical stresses. The finding may lead to new treatments for diseases associated with inflammation, such as atherosclerosis.

Released:
11-Mar-2010 10:30 AM EST
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Article ID: 562289

Mayo Clinic Study on How to Minimize Radiation Risks of Angioplasty Shows Highest Doses in Men, Large Body Mass, Complex Cases

Mayo Clinic

Body size, gender and the complexity of heart disease significantly influence how much cumulative radiation skin dose that patients receive during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) therapy, also known as angioplasty, according to a new Mayo Clinic study. The study was undertaken as a quality control initiative to reduce the potential radiation risks of cancer to patients and PCI operators.

Released:
15-Mar-2010 11:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 562291

Cardiac Rehabilitation Helps Survival Time in Heart Patients Receiving Stent Therapy

Mayo Clinic

A team of Mayo Clinic researchers have found that cardiac rehabilitation is associated with significantly reduced mortality rates for patients who have had stents placed to treat blockages in their coronary arteries. The findings, presented today at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology in Atlanta, found that patients who had coronary angioplasty (stent placement, also known as percutaneous coronary intervention) and afterwards participated in a cardiac rehabilitation program had a 45 to 47 percent decrease in mortality compared to those who did not participate in a cardiac rehabilitation program.

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15-Mar-2010 11:00 AM EDT
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Heart Disease

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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Mar-2010 5:00 PM EST

Article ID: 562173

New Drug Reduces Bad Cholesterol and Triglycerides without Statin Side Effects

Houston Methodist

A new drug, eprotirome, has been shown to significantly lower bad cholesterol, triglycerides and Lp(A), without the side effects that statins cause in many people.

Released:
10-Mar-2010 2:30 PM EST
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Article ID: 562172

Research Points to Way to Improve Heart Treatment

University of Iowa

Current drugs used to treat heart failure and irregular heartbeat have limited effectiveness and have side effects. New basic science findings suggest a way that treatments could potentially be refined so that they work better and target only key heart-related mechanisms.

Released:
10-Mar-2010 2:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 562120

Geisinger Collaborates on National Research Project: Investigators to Study the Care, Outcomes of Young Women with Heart Disease

Geisinger Health System

Geisinger Health System and Yale School of Medicine investigators are researching how young people recover from heart attacks through VIRGO (Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes in Young AMI Patients), a research project funded by the National, Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

Released:
9-Mar-2010 11:45 AM EST
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Heart Disease

Article ID: 562097

Novel Program Translates Behavioral and Social Science Research Into Treatments to Reduce Obesity

Rush University Medical Center

Under a $7.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, Rush University Medical Center is developing a novel program, called WISHFIT, to help pre-menopausal women reduce visceral fat through a sustained increase in physical activity and reduction in stress. The program will be designed by both Rush researchers and women in two Southside Chicago communities.

Released:
8-Mar-2010 2:45 PM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 561972

Beta Blocker Therapy Underused in Heart Failure Patients

Saint Louis University Medical Center

New Saint Louis University research found that beta blockers are underused in heart failure patients who receive an implantable cardiac device, suggesting a reliance on technology rather than conventional drug therapy.

Released:
3-Mar-2010 7:00 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Mar-2010 12:05 AM EST

Article ID: 561759

Obese 3-Year-olds Show Early Warning Signs for Future Heart Disease

University of North Carolina Health Care System

A study by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers found that obese children as young as 3 years old have elevated levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation that in adults is considered an early warning sign for possible future heart disease.

Released:
25-Feb-2010 10:35 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Feb-2010 5:00 PM EST

Article ID: 561608

Lasofoxifene Helps Reduce Risk of Bone Fractures, Breast Cancer, Heart Disease and Stroke

California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute

Low doses of the medication lasofoxifene can reduce the risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures, ER-positive breast cancer, coronary heart disease and stroke in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. That’s the finding of a new study in the latest issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Released:
23-Feb-2010 9:00 AM EST
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Cancer, Heart Disease


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