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ASCB|EMBO 2017 meeting, Cell Biology, Scientific conference, SPARGO, exhibit floor

The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) Appoints SPARGO, Inc. as Official Exposition and Advertising Sales and Management Firm

In August of 2017, SPARGO, Inc. will assume responsibility for the management of exhibit and sponsorship sales for the American Society for Cell Biology’s 2017 and 2018 ASCB|EMBO Meetings and 2019 and 2020 Annual Meetings. Additionally, SPARGO will sell advertising in ASCB’s three publications and other digital communications.

Medicine

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Bone Marrow, stem, Stem Cell, Blood Disease, Blood Disorders, Lymphoma, Myeloma

Stem Cell Transplant Program Celebrates First Year

The University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center began helping New Mexicans with blood disorders a little more than one year ago. It is the state’s only bone marrow transplant program. The program offers treatment choices for people with lymphoma and myeloma and will expand to help people with other blood disorders.

Medicine

Science

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Wilms, Wilms Tumor, Genetic Mutation

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Aug-2017 11:05 AM EDT

Medicine

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Yale Cancer Center, Pancreatic Cancer, PON2, cancer gene

Study Pinpoints Gene’s New Role in Pancreatic Cancer

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Pancreatic cancer is a particularly deadly form of disease, and patients have few options for effective treatment. But a new Yale Cancer Center study has identified a gene that is critical to pancreatic cancer cell growth, revealing a fresh target for new therapies.

Science

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ants, Social Insects, Genetic Engineering, Danny reinberg, Smell, orco

Genetically Engineered Ants Showcase Smell’s Role in Social Behavior

After creating mutant Indian jumping ants with no sense of smell, HHMI Investigator Danny Reinberg and colleagues saw profound abnormalities in the ants’ behavior and brains. The results show that the sense of smell is fundamental to maintaining colony harmony.

Science

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Sociology, DNA, white supremacist, science and race

When DNA Evidence Challenges Ideas of A Person’s Racial Purity, White Supremacists Use a Decision Tree to Affirm or Discount the Results

Now that science can determine a person’s racial and ethnic origins from a cheek swab, those devoted to ideas of racial “purity,” are employing methods of mind games and logic twists to support their beliefs despite facing evidence of their own multiracial heritage.

Medicine

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Mount Sinai Health System, Ovarian Cancer, Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, Genetic Testing, Emerging Therapies

Know Your Risk for Ovarian Cancer Mount Sinai Experts Share Tips for Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month in September

Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of death in American women and according to the National Cancer Institute, approximately 22,000 women will be diagnosed with the disease and 14,000 will die from it.

Science

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Opinion, Public Opinion, Surveys, Science, human genome editing, Gene Editing

Attitudes on Human Genome Editing Vary, but All Agree Conversation Is Necessary

In a study published Aug. 11 in the journal Science, researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Temple University assessed what people in the United States think about the uses of human genome editing and how their attitudes may drive public discussion. They found a public divided on its uses but united in the importance of moving conversations forward.

Medicine

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Transplanation, Transplant, Organ, Organ And Tissue Donation, organ allocation, Research, Science, CRISP/Cas9, CRISPR

Xenotransplantation Expert Available for Comment on Advancement in Use of Gene-Editing to Inactivate PERVs

Science

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Science, Biology, Archaea, Nucleosome, DNA, Histone

Origins of DNA Folding Suggested in Archaea

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Proteins in archaea bend strands of DNA in a way that’s similar in eukaryotes, new research from HHMI investigator and colleagues reveals. That similarity hints at the evolutionary origin of the elaborate folding that eukaryotic cells use to cram their genome into a nucleus.







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