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Drug Target, GPCR, Parkinson's Disease, Cell Biology, NMR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

New Structure of Key Protein Holds Clues for Better Drug Design

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Nobel laureate Kurt Wüthrich investigates the structure of an important drug target.

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dememtia , Alzheimber's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Exercise, Cognitive Training, cholinesterase inhibitors

Exercise and Cognitive Training May Be Most Effective in Reducing MCI, an Alzheimer’s Disease Pre-Cursor

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Clinicians should recommend exercise and cognitive training for patients with mild cognitive impairment — a common precursor of Alzheimer’s type dementia — according to new guidelines published online in Neurology®.

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Guideline: Exercise May Improve Thinking Ability and Memory

Exercising twice a week may improve thinking ability and memory in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), according to a guideline released by the American Academy of Neurology. The recommendation is an update to the AAN’s previous guideline on mild cognitive impairment and is published in the December 27, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The guideline is endorsed by the Alzheimer’s Association.

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Alzheimer’s disease, Dr. Petersen, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Minnesota News Releases, news releases

New Guideline: Try Exercise to Improve Memory, Thinking

For patients with mild cognitive impairment, don’t be surprised if your health care provider prescribes exercise rather than medication. A new guideline for medical practitioners says they should recommend twice-weekly exercise to people with mild cognitive impairment to improve memory and thinking.

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Social Network, Cognitive Function, Chinese, Older Adults

Social Relations in Older Age May Help Grandma Maintain Her Memory

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center show that close social relationships may be the key to late life cognitive function.

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Press Room Registration Is Open for 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Registration is now open to journalists planning to attend the 70th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) in Los Angeles, April 21 to 27, 2018. The AAN Annual Meeting is the world’s largest gathering of neurologists who come together to share the latest advances in neurologic research.

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Environmental Stressors, CRISPR Treatment for Hearing Loss, Mitochondria and Cocaine Addiction, and More in the Cell Biology News Source

The latest research and features in cell biology in the Cell Biology News Source

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NIH BRAIN Initiative, Rutishauser, alzheimers, Memory

Cedars-Sinai Investigators to Lead Multi-Center Study Into How Memories Are Formed

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Cedars-Sinai investigators will lead a multi-center study into how the brain’s circuitry forms and recalls memories — research made possible by a $3.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

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Will a Salad a Day Keep Memory Problems Away?

Eating about one serving per day of green, leafy vegetables may be linked to a slower rate of brain aging, according to a study published in the December 20, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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cognitive abilities, Cognitive decline and aging, alzheimer disease, Dementia, Nutrition

Putting a Fork in Cognitive Decline

While cognitive abilities naturally decline with age, eating one serving of leafy green vegetables a day may aid in preserving memory and thinking skills as a person grows older, according to a study by researchers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. The study results were published in the December 20, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.







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