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Medicine

Science

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Biochemistry, Notch, Glycobiology

Sugary Secrets of a Cancer-Related Protein

The proteins in human cells are extensively decorated with different types of sugars, a phenomenon called glycosylation. These modifications greatly increase the diversity of protein structure and function, affecting how proteins fold, how they behave, and where they go in cells. New research that will be published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry on Sept. 22 demonstrates that a rare type of glycosylation profoundly affects the function of a protein important for human development and cancer progression.

Medicine

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SIDS, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, Serotonin, Brain Chemistry, Pathology, Child Deaths, safe sleep

SIDS Research Confirms Changes in Babies' Brain Chemistry

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University of Adelaide researchers have confirmed that abnormalities in a common brain chemical are linked to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Science

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Chemistry, Materials, Crystallization, MICA, Minerals

New Insights Into Nanocrystal Growth in Liquid

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PNNL researchers have measured the forces that cause certain crystals to assemble, revealing competing factors that researchers might be able to control. The work has a variety of implications in both discovery and applied science. In addition to providing insights into the formation of minerals and semiconductor nanomaterials, it might also help scientists understand soil as it expands and contracts through wetting and drying cycles.

Science

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Chemical Engineering, Sustainability, nuclear waste disposal, nuclear waste management, agricultural runoff, Desalinization, Water Pollution, radioactive waste, Molecular Engineering, Environmental Science, Molecular Design, Pollution, Chemistry, Material Science, material chemistry

Discovery Could Reduce Nuclear Waste with Improved Method to Chemically Engineer Molecules

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A new chemical principle discovered by scientists at Indiana University has the potential to revolutionize the creation of specially engineered molecules whose uses include the reduction of nuclear waste and the extraction of chemical pollutants from water and soil.

Science

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plant waste, Biofuel, Bioplastics, re-engineering, Mutations, bacterial enzymes, Bacteria, protein module, Mateusz Chwastyk, Andrés M. Vera, Albert Galera-Prat, Melissabye Gunnoo, Damien Thompson, Mariano Carrión-Vázquez, Marek Cieplak, polish academy of sciences, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, University of Limerick, The Journal Of Chemic

Getting to the Point (Mutations) in Re-Engineering Biofuel-Producing Bacterial Enzymes

Helping bacteria become more efficient when breaking down fibrous plant waste into biofuel could result in more affordable biofuels for our gas tanks and sustainable products such as bioplastics. One way to achieve this goal is to re-engineer the bacterial enzyme complexes, called cellulosomes, which serve as catalysts in the degradation process. Researchers discuss one method to produce cellulosomes in The Journal of Chemical Physics.

Medicine

Science

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Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Evolution

UChicago Scientists Create Alternate Evolutionary Histories in a Test Tube

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Scientists at the University of Chicago studied a massive set of genetic variants of an ancient protein, discovering a myriad of other ways that evolution could have turned out and revealing a central role for chance in evolutionary history.

Science

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Cryo Electron Microscopy, Structural Biology

Berkeley Lab Scientists Map Key DNA Protein Complex at Near-Atomic Resolution

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Using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), Berkeley Lab scientists have obtained 3-D models of a human transcription factor at near-atomic resolutions. The protein complex is critical to gene expression and DNA repair, and could aid research in targeted drug development.

Medicine

Science

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Michigan Tech, Xiaohu Xia, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Cancer Detection, Nanoparticle, gold nanoparticles

Test Strips for Cancer Detection Get Upgraded with Nanoparticle Bling

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Detecting cancer could be as easy as a home pregnancy test. Platinum-coated gold nanoparticles developed by Michigan Technological University researchers could make cheap and simple test strip detection a reality.

Science

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smart label, Cosmetics, Food, Chemistry

Smart Label Spots Spoilage Before It Happens

A bite of bad yogurt or sip of spoiled milk could be a thing of the past thanks to a new sensor developed by Clarkson University Professor Silvana Andreescu. The innovative “smart label” is a low-cost, portable, paper-based sensor that can determine when food or cosmetics spoil.

Science

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Shale, shale gas, green house gas emissions

New Engineering Research Center to Focus on Challenges of Upgrading Shale Gas

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Chemical engineers at the University of Notre Dame will contribute their expertise in materials development and modeling to a new research center that will focus on new methods of converting shale gas reserves into chemicals and transportation fuel.







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