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Article ID: 694730

Ebola Virus - Subject Matter Experts at Georgetown

Georgetown University Medical Center

Released:
17-May-2018 8:55 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694722

Social Connections May Prevent HIV Infection Among Black Men Who Have Sex with Men

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

FINDINGS UCLA-led research suggests that receiving support from friends and acquaintances can help prevent black men who have sex with men from becoming infected with HIV. BACKGROUND Black men who have sex with men have disproportionately high rates of HIV infection. While social connections are known to influence the behaviors that influence people’s risk for HIV, little is known about whether they affect the risk for becoming infected with HIV.

Released:
16-May-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-May-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694527

Why Chikungunya, Other Arthritis-Causing Viruses Target Joints

Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists have understood little about how chikungunya and related viruses cause arthritis. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified the molecular handle that chikungunya grabs to get inside cells. The findings, published May 16 in the journal Nature, could lead to ways to prevent or treat disease caused by chikungunya and related viruses.

Released:
14-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694642

Rare Diseases: Addressing the Challenges in Diagnosis, Drug Approval, and Patient Access

ISPOR—The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research

Value in Health, the official journal of ISPOR (the professional society for health economics and outcomes research), announced today the publication of a series of articles offering important insight regarding the challenges in rare disease diagnosis, drug approval, and patient access.

Released:
16-May-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694591

Study: Superbug MRSA Infections Less Costly, but Still Deadly

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Drug-resistant staph infections continue to be deadlier than those that are not resistant and treatable with traditional antibiotics, but treatment costs surprisingly are the same or slightly less, a new national analysis shows.

Released:
15-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694587

Different Diseases Elicit Distinct Sets of Exhausted T Cells

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The battle between the human immune system and long-term, persisting infections and other chronic diseases such as cancer results in a prolonged stalemate. Over time battle-weary T cells become exhausted, giving germs or tumors an edge. Using data from multiple molecular databases, researchers have found nine distinct types of exhausted T cells, which could have implications for fighting chronic infections, autoimmunity, and cancer.

Released:
15-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    14-May-2018 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694377

New Pig Virus Found to Be a Potential Threat to Humans

Ohio State University

A recently identified pig virus can readily find its way into laboratory-cultured cells of people and other species, a discovery that raises concerns about the potential for outbreaks that threaten human and animal health.

Released:
10-May-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694538

Vaccine-Induced Antibodies Against One Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Found to Disarm Related Virus for Which There Is No Vaccine

Harvard Medical School

Research conducted in vitro shows two human antibodies made in response to vaccination against one hemorrhagic fever virus can disarm a related virus, for which there is currently no vaccine. The proof-of-principle finding identifies a common molecular chink in the two viruses’ armor that renders both vulnerable to the same antibodies. The results set the stage for a single vaccine and other antibody-based treatments that work against multiple viral “cousins” despite key differences in their genetic makeup. Such therapies can alleviate challenges posed by current lack of vaccines and prevent outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fevers.

Released:
14-May-2018 2:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694529

Mapping the Body’s Battle with Ebola and Zika

Los Alamos National Laboratory

The viruses that cause Ebola and Zika, daunting diseases that inspire concern at every outbreak, share a strong similarity in how they first infiltrate a host’s cells.

Released:
14-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694477

Tip Sheet: Johns Hopkins Researchers Present Study Findings at Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Meeting 2018

Johns Hopkins Medicine

The annual meeting of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM). The SAEM 2018 meeting will bring together more than 3,000 physicians, researchers, residents and medical students from around the world.

Released:
14-May-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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