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Science

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Supercapacitor, supercapacitance, vertical graphene nanosheets, Electrolyte, nano, Energy, Energy Storage, aqueous, Organic, Subrata Ghosh, Gopinath Sahoo, S.R. Polaki, Nanda Gopala Krishna, M. Kamruddin, Tom Mathews, Homi Bhabha National Institute, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Journal of Applied Physics

Hybrid Electrolyte Enhances Supercapacitance in Vertical Graphene Nanosheets

Supercapacitors can store more energy than and are preferable to batteries because they are able to charge faster, mainly due to the vertical graphene nanosheets that are larger and positioned closer together. Using VGNs as the material for supercapacitor electrodes offers advantages due to their intriguing properties, and those advantages can be enhanced depending on how the material is grown, treated and prepared to work with electrolytes. In this week’s Journal of Applied Physics, researchers discuss their work to improve the material’s supercapacitance properties.

Science

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Nanoengineering, Nanotechnology, Nanomanufacturing, Integrated Photonics Research, Scalability

Making humanity's challenges smaller and smaller: UW launches Institute for Nano-Engineered Systems

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The University of Washington has launched a new institute aimed at accelerating research at the nanoscale: the Institute for Nano-Engineered Systems, or NanoES. Housed in a new, multimillion-dollar facility on the UW's Seattle campus, the institute will pursue impactful advancements in a variety of disciplines — including energy, materials science, computation and medicine.

Science

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Nanotechnology, Graphene, disease diagnostic system

Researchers Develop Graphene Nano ‘Tweezers’ That Can Grab Individual Biomolecules

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Researchers from the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have found yet another remarkable use for the wonder material graphene—tiny electronic “tweezers” that can grab individual biomolecules with incredible efficiency. This capability could lead to a revolutionary handheld disease diagnostic system that could be run on a smart phone.

Science

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Nanorobots, flagella, Nanoscale, biotemplated, Bioinspired, Bacteria, nanoswimming, Jamel Ali, U Kei Cheang, Armin Darvish, Hoyeon Kim, Min Jun Kim, Drexel University, Southern Methodist University, South University of Science and Technology (China), APL Materials

Going Swimmingly: Biotemplates Breakthrough Paves Way for Cheaper Nanobots

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New developments may now propel nanoswimmers from science fiction to reality thanks to unexpected help from bacteria. An international research team has demonstrated a new technique for plating silica onto flagella, the helix-shaped tails found on many bacteria, to produce nanoscale swimming robots. As reported this week in APL Materials, the group’s biotemplated nanoswimmers spin their flagella thanks to rotating magnetic fields and can perform nearly as well as living bacteria.

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New Stars Near Supermassive Black Holes, Ghostly Neutrinos, Old Nearby Stars, and More in the Space News Source

The latest in space and astronomy in the Space News Source

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Three Elected Foreign Members of Chinese Academy of Sciences

In a rare honor for an American university, three Northwestern University scientists — Sir Fraser Stoddart, Chad Mirkin and Yonggang Huang — have been elected foreign members of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The three were selected for their scientific achievements and contributions to promoting the development of science and technology in China.

Science

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Graphene, Transistors, transistor fabrication, nanoribbons, Semiconductor, Nanoelecronics

A Transistor of Graphene Nanoribbons

Transistors based on carbon nanostructures: what sounds like a futuristic dream could be reality in just a few years' time. An international research team working with Empa has now succeeded in producing nanotransistors from graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide, as reported in the current issue of the trade journal "Nature Communications."

Science

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material sciences, Ames Laboratory, solar cell development, rare earth materials, Electron Microscopy, Raman Spectroscopy

Addition of Tin Boosts Nanoparticle’s Photoluminescence

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Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory have developed germanium nanoparticles with improved photoluminescence, making them potentially better materials for solar cells and imaging probes. The research team found that by adding tin to the nanoparticle’s germanium core, its lattice structure better matched the lattice structure of the cadmium-sulfide coating which allows the particles to absorb more light.

Science

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fidget spinner, STEM outreach, user facility, Nanoscience, Electron Microscope, 3D printing

World’s Smallest Fidget Spinner Showcases Access to Serious Science Facility

One drop of liquid, a cutting-edge laser 3D-printer and a few hours are all it takes to make a fidget spinner smaller than the width of a human hair. The tiny whirligig was created by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences to illustrate the facility’s unique resources and expertise available to scientists across the world. The microscale fidget spinner measures only 100 microns wide, or one tenth of a millimeter, but the capabilities it represents are enormous.

Science

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Energy, Building Design, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy, Chemical Sciences & Engineering, Materials Science

Solar Cell Discovery Opens a New Window to Powering Tomorrow’s Cities

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Windows that generate electricity may have a clearer path to prominent roles in buildings of the future due to an Argonne-led discovery.







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