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Article ID: 695919

Algorithm Predicts Dangerous Low Blood Pressure During Surgery

American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

Scientists have developed an algorithm that predicts potentially dangerous low blood pressure, or hypotension, that can occur during surgery. The algorithm identifies hypotension 15 minutes before it occurs in 84 percent of cases, the researchers report in a new study published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology.

Released:
11-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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    11-Jun-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695370

Adapting Lifestyle Habits Can Quickly Lower Blood Pressure

American Society for Nutrition (ASN)

Researchers have demonstrated that a program aimed at helping people modify lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise is as effective as medication at reducing blood pressure.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Jun-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695388

Scientists Identify Foods that Fight Disease

American Society for Nutrition (ASN)

Nutrition 2018 will feature the latest research into how adding certain foods to our diet might help lower risk for diabetes, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and other health issues.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695762

Scientists ID source of damaging inflammation after heart attack

Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists have zeroed in on a culprit that spurs damaging inflammation in the heart following a heart attack. The guilty party is a type of immune cell that tries to heal the injured heart but instead triggers inflammation that leads to even more damage. The researchers, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that an already approved drug effectively tamps down such inflammation in mice, protecting the heart from the progressive damage that often occurs after a heart attack.

Released:
7-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Jun-2018 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695698

Consumers Beware: High User ‘Star Ratings’ Don’t Mean A Mobile Medical App Works (B-roll)

Johns Hopkins Medicine

By screening 250 user reviews and comments for a once popular -- but proven inaccurate -- mobile app claiming to change your iPhone into a blood pressure monitor, Johns Hopkins researchers have added to evidence that a high “star rating” doesn’t necessarily reflect medical accuracy or value.

Released:
6-Jun-2018 1:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695649

CRF Invites NYC Women of All Ages to Attend Free Seminar on Healthy Aging of the Heart

Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF)

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) will hold a free seminar, “Healthy Aging: What Women Need to Know About Heart Health at Every Age,” on Thursday, June 14, 2018 in New York City. The seminar, part of a series of Mini-Med School seminars conducted by the CRF Women’s Heart Health Initiative, will focus on providing women with practical ways to keep their heart healthy at all stages of life. Attendees will learn about lifestyle changes, risk factors, and treatment options for coronary artery disease and aortic stenosis, two conditions that develop as you age.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Jun-2018 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695179

Clinical Trials in a Dish: A Perspective on the Coming Revolution in Drug Development

SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening)

Researchers share perspective about Clinical Trials in a Dish (CTiD), a novel strategy that bridges preclinical testing and clinical trials.

Released:
30-May-2018 1:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695585

Researchers Successfully, Safely Lengthen Intervals Between Blood Draws For Warfarin Patients

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study finds stable patients on blood thinners may not need to get their blood drawn as often as they currently do. Researchers were able to increase the number of people waiting longer than five weeks in between their INR blood draws from less than half (41.8%) to more than two-thirds (69.3%).

Released:
4-Jun-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695572

Loyola Medicine Offering Free Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

Loyola University Health System

More than one million Americans are living with an undiagnosed silent killer called an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). On Saturday, June 9, Loyola Medicine will hold a free ultrasound screening for people at risk for AAAs.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 677920

How an Enzyme Repairs DNA, Controlling DNA-Based Robots, Neural Stem Cells Helping to Repair Spinal Cord Injuries, and More in the Cell Biology News Source

Newswise

The latest research and features in cell biology in the Cell Biology News Source

Released:
1-Jun-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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