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Article ID: 698925

One Antiplatelet Drug After Heart Valve Replacement Works as Well as Two, with Fewer Complications

Loyola University Health System

Treatment guidelines say patients who undergo minimally invasive aortic heart valve replacements should receive two antiplatelet drugs to reduce the risk of dangerous blood clots. A Loyola Medicine study has found that a single antiplatelet drug may work just as well, with lower risks of life-threatening bleeding and other complications.

Released:
13-Aug-2018 6:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698882

Study Reveals Broad ‘Genetic Architectures’ of Traits and Diseases

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have developed a powerful method for characterizing the broad patterns of genetic contributions to traits and diseases.

Released:
13-Aug-2018 11:55 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698879

A Simple Score to Identify Who Is at High Risk for Hospital Readmission After Suffering a Heart Attack

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Tracking just seven factors of heart attack patients when they are first admitted to the hospital can help flag those most at risk for 30-day readmission, researchers from UT Southwestern found.

Released:
13-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698660

Artificial Intelligence Platform Screens for Acute Neurological Illnesses at Mount Sinai

Mount Sinai Health System

The study’s findings lay the framework for applying deep learning and computer vision techniques to radiological imaging.

Released:
7-Aug-2018 1:15 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Aug-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698737

Grip Strength of Children Gives Clues about Their Future Health

Baylor University

Adolescents with a strong hand grip — an indicator of overall muscle strength — have better odds of being healthy over time, according to a two-year study of 368 elementary school children. A simple, non-invasive measure of grip strength can help identity risks of pre-diabetes and cardiovascular disease, issues of increasing concern as obesity in youths rises.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    9-Aug-2018 6:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 698716

Pass the salt: Study finds average consumption safe for heart health

McMaster University

New research shows that for the vast majority of individuals, sodium consumption does not increase health risks except for those who eat more than five grams a day, the equivalent of 2.5 teaspoons of salt. The research, published in The Lancet, is by scientists of the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, along with their research colleagues from 21 countries.

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8-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698801

Epigenetic Reprogramming of Human Hearts Found in Congestive Heart Failure

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Researchers have now described an underlying mechanism that reprograms the hearts of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, a process that differs from patients with other forms of heart failure. This points the way toward future personalized care.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698793

Young Drinkers Beware: Binge Drinking May Cause Stroke, Heart Risks

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

You might want to think before you go out drinking again tonight. Research by Mariann Piano, senior associate dean of research at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, has found that young adults who frequently binge drink were more likely to have specific cardiovascular risk factors such as higher blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar at a younger age than non-binge drinkers.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698759

Estrogen May Protect Against Depression after Heart Attack

American Physiological Society (APS)

Estrogen may protect against heart failure-related depression by preventing the production of inflammation-causing chemicals in the brain. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698714

Penn Medicine’s Commitment to Encouraging Healthy Lifestyles for Patients and Staff Now Extends to Food and Beverages

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Sodas, sports drinks, sweetened juices, fast food and grab-and-go vending machine snacks are staples of many American diets, and this fare has become a major contributor to obesity and chronic disease across the nation. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the added sugars from sugary drinks are directly tied to an increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Penn Medicine is taking strides to eliminate these foods from its facilities in an effort to ensure that the food its serves aligns with its missions to care for, educate and empower patients who are coping with heart disease, diabetes, and many other illnesses.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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