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Article ID: 631630

WIU Professor, Former FBI Agent's Latest Book, "The Like Switch," Provides Tips for How to Influence and Win People Over

Western Illinois University

A Western Illinois University professor's new book covers techniques that individuals can use to can influence, attract and win people over. WIU School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration Assistant Professor and former FBI Special Agent Jack Schafer's "The Like Switch," according to the publisher's website, "is a handbook filled with his proven strategies on how to instantly read people and influence how they perceive you…."

Released:
24-Mar-2015 11:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 631430

Men’s Preference for Certain Body Types Has Evolutionary Roots

University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

A psychology study from The University of Texas at Austin sheds new light on today’s standards of beauty, attributing modern men’s preferences for women with a curvy backside to prehistoric influences.

Released:
19-Mar-2015 2:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 631418

Study: Emoticons Make Men More Jealous Than Women

Dick Jones Communications

A new Roanoke College study finds a gender difference in Facebook jealousy when it comes to emoticon usage.

Released:
19-Mar-2015 1:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    19-Mar-2015 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 631110

Our Eyes Multi-Task Even When We Don’t Want Them to, Researchers Find

New York University

Our eyes are drawn to several dimensions of an object—such as color, texture, and luminance—even when we need to focus on only one of them, researchers at New York University and the University of Pennsylvania have found.

Released:
13-Mar-2015 9:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Mar-2015 8:30 AM EDT

Article ID: 631291

The Cost of Dominance

University of Utah

Utah researchers conducted four studies to gauge the health effects of the hostile-dominant personality style compared with the warm-dominant style. Their findings are bad news for aggressive power-seekers.

Released:
18-Mar-2015 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 631271

Scientists Confirm Institute of Medicine Recommendation for Vitamin D Intake Was Miscalculated and Is Far Too Low

Creighton University

Researchers are challenging the intake of vitamin D recommended by the National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine saying their Recommended Dietary Allowance for vitamin D underestimates the need by a factor of ten.

Released:
17-Mar-2015 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Mar-2015 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 630926

Harder-to-Abuse OxyContin Doesn’t Stop Illicit Use

Washington University in St. Louis

A reformulation of OxyContin that makes it less likely to be abused than the older formulation has curtailed the drug’s illicit use. But researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that a significant percentage still abuse the drug despite package labeling that emphasizes its abuse-deterrent properties.

Released:
12-Mar-2015 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 630929

​Look, Something Shiny! How Color Images Can Influence Consumers

Ohio State University

When it comes to buying things, our brains can’t see the big, black-and-white forest for all the tiny, colorful trees. That’s the conclusion of a study at The Ohio State University, which found that people who were shown product images in color were more likely to focus on small product details—even superfluous ones—instead of practical concerns such as cost and functionality.

Released:
10-Mar-2015 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 630933

Move Over Mozart: Study Shows Cats Prefer Their Own Beat

University of Wisconsin-Madison

As more animal shelters, primate centers and zoos start to play music for their charges, it’s still not clear whether and how human music affects animals. Now, a study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows that while cats ignore our music, they are highly responsive to “music” written especially for them. The study is online at Applied Animal Behaviour Science.

Released:
10-Mar-2015 2:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 630804

Boredom and Frustration Trigger Skin-Picking and Other Compulsive Behaviors

Universite de Montreal

- Individuals who get easily bored, frustrated or impatient are more inclined to develop skin-picking and other body-focused repetitive behaviors, say researchers at the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal and the University of Montreal.

Released:
10-Mar-2015 7:05 AM EDT
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