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Article ID: 623147

Sometimes, Adolescents Just Can't Resist

University of Iowa

A University of Iowa study finds teenagers are far more sensitive than adults to the immediate effect or reward of their behaviors. Even when a behavior is no longer in a teenager’s best interest to continue, they will because the effect of the reward is still there and lasts much longer in adolescents than in adults.

Released:
11-Sep-2014 10:00 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 623125

Childhood Mentors Have Positive Impact on Career Success

North Carolina State University

New research finds that young people who have had mentors are more likely to find work early in their careers that gives them more responsibility and autonomy – ultimately putting them on a path to more financially and personally rewarding careers.

Released:
11-Sep-2014 6:50 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    10-Sep-2014 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 623054

New Study Examines Impact of Violent Media on the Brain

Mount Sinai Health System

Exposure to violence has a different effect on people with aggressive traits

Released:
9-Sep-2014 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 623051

Your Parents Were Right: New Research Shows Importance of Saying Thank You

Gonzaga University

Saying thank you has been among the commonest of cultural civilities for centuries. Now new research offers the first evidence that expressions of gratitude go beyond mere etiquette and provide real social benefit.

Released:
9-Sep-2014 3:00 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 622987

Liberal Countries Have More Satisfied Citizens While Conservatives Are Happier Individuals

American Psychological Association (APA)

People living in more liberal countries are happier on average than those in less liberal countries, but individually, conservatives are happier than liberals no matter where they live, according to a study of people in 16 Western European countries.

Released:
9-Sep-2014 9:20 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 622912

Seminaries Do Very Little to Train Pastors How to Help Mentally Ill Congregants

Baylor University

People struggling with mental illness often turn to pastors for help, but seminaries do very little to train ministers how to recognize serious psychological distress and when to refer someone to a doctor or psychologist, Baylor research shows.

Released:
8-Sep-2014 9:50 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 622830

Answering the Call for Hope

Rutgers University

As the NJ Hopeline moves into its second year, the state’s suicide prevention hotline operated by Rutgers counts its success one call at a time.

Released:
4-Sep-2014 1:00 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 622824

2-D or 3-D? That is the Question

University of Utah

Researchers at the University of Utah examined whether 3-D film is more effective than 2-D when used as a research method for evoking emotion. Both were effective, and 3-D did not add incremental benefit over 2-D, with implications for emotional research as well as entertainment.

Released:
4-Sep-2014 12:00 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    4-Sep-2014 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 622762

Reacting to Personal Setbacks: Do You Bounce Back or Give Up?

Rutgers University

Sometimes when people get upsetting news – such as a failing exam grade or a negative job review – they decide instantly to do better the next time. In other situations that are equally disappointing, the same people may feel inclined to just give up. How can similar setbacks produce such different reactions? It may come down to how much control we feel we have over what happened, according to new research from Rutgers University-Newark. The study, published in the journal Neuron, also finds that when these setbacks occur, the level of control we perceive may even determine which of two distinct parts of the brain will handle the crisis.

Released:
3-Sep-2014 12:00 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 622796

Cannabis Prevents the Negative Behavioral and Physiological Effects of a Traumatic Event and of Its Reminders

University of Haifa

Administering synthetic marijuana (cannabinoids) soon after a traumatic event can prevent PTSD-like (post-traumatic stress disorder) symptoms in rats, caused by the trauma and by trauma reminders

Released:
4-Sep-2014 2:00 AM EDT
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