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Article ID: 531257

Blood Protein Offers Clues to Heart Attack in Healthy People

American College of Cardiology (ACC)

We've all wondered how a seemingly healthy person can actually be at high risk for heart disease or a heart attack. Now researchers have uncovered a new clue to this mystery. The culprit: myeloperoxidase (MPO), a protein secreted by white blood cells that both signals inflammation and releases a bleach-like substance that damages the cardiovascular system.

Released:
3-Jul-2007 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 530764

Genetic Defect Links Respiratory Disease and Congenital Heart Disease

University of North Carolina Health Care System

The same genetic defect that causes a rare respiratory disease may also lead to some types of congenital heart disease, according to a study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine.

Released:
11-Jun-2007 2:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 530748

Fighting the Deadliest Killers: Heart Disease and Stroke

Belvoir Media Group

The three pillars of health--exercise, diet and smoking cessation--can significantly reduce your risk of dying from two of the leading causes of mortality in America.

Released:
11-Jun-2007 11:50 AM EDT
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Article ID: 530593

What Women Need to Know: Getting the Facts About Women and Heart Disease

Baylor Scott and White Health

Many women don't worry about heart disease, or if they do, they are concerned it's something the men in their lives might develop. But that attitude is a mistake. While it's true that estrogen gives women some protection against the disease, at least until menopause, heart disease is still the leading killer of American women. Here's what women should watch for.

Released:
5-Jun-2007 8:50 AM EDT
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Article ID: 530411

Exercise Test May Predict Mortality Risk in Heart Failure Patients

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

A simple exercise test may help predict mortality risk in patients with heart failure and help doctors to better tailor treatment strategies, according to new research from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

Released:
30-May-2007 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 530336

Physicians Urged to Take Measured Approach in Response to Potential Avandia Risks

Endocrine Society

The Endocrine Society urges physicians to respond in a measured way to a recent study suggesting the diabetes drug Avandia (rosiglitazone) increases the risk of heart disease and heart attacks.

Released:
25-May-2007 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 529768

Animal Research Raises Possibility of End to Fat-free Diets

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

A new study in mice raises a tantalizing possibility "“ that humans may one day be able to eat any kind of fat they want without raising their risk of heart disease.

Released:
7-May-2007 3:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 528465

Higher Trans Fat Levels in Blood Associated With Elevated Risk of Heart Disease

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

A new study from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) provides the strongest association to date between trans fat and heart disease. It found that women in the U.S. with the highest levels of trans fat in their blood had three times the risk of CHD as those with the lowest levels.

Released:
27-Mar-2007 4:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Mar-2007 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 528278

Tiny Molecule Controls Stress-induced Heart Disease

UT Southwestern Medical Center

A tiny snippet of RNA, a chemical cousin of DNA, controls damage to the heart under several types of stress, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found.

Released:
20-Mar-2007 5:55 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Mar-2007 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 528259

Emergency Responses Greatly Increase Risk to Firefighters of Dying on Duty From Heart Disease

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

In a new, large-scale study, researchers examined the link between CHD deaths and firefighting and looked at specific job duties to see which might increase the risk of dying from a coronary event. The landmark study provides the strongest link to date between CHD and emergency firefighting duties. It found that putting out fires was associated with a risk about 10 to 100 times greater than the risk of dying from non-emergency duties.

Released:
20-Mar-2007 3:15 PM EDT
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