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Article ID: 590227

Computer Model Successfully Predicts Drug Side Effects

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

A new set of computer models has successfully predicted negative side effects in hundreds of current drugs, based on the similarity between their chemical structures and those molecules known to cause side effects, according to a paper appearing online this week in the journal Nature.

Released:
11-Jun-2012 12:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Jun-2012 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 590070

New Twist on Old Chemical Process Could Boost Energy Efficiency

University of Washington

An unappreciated aspect of chemical reactions on the surface of metal oxides could be key in developing more efficient energy systems, including more productive solar cells or hydrogen fuel cells efficient enough for automobiles.

Released:
6-Jun-2012 8:00 AM EDT
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    4-Jun-2012 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 589868

Mayo Clinic IDs Immune System Glitch Tied to Fourfold Higher Likelihood of Death

Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic researchers have identified an immune system deficiency whose presence shows someone is up to four times likelier to die than a person without it. The glitch involves an antibody molecule called a free light chain; people whose immune systems produce too much of the molecule are far more likely to die of a life-threatening illness such as cancer, diabetes and cardiac and respiratory disease than those whose bodies make normal levels. The study is published in the June issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Released:
30-May-2012 2:45 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    31-May-2012 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 589885

Iron May Have Performed Magnesium’s RNA Folding Job on Early Earth

Georgia Institute of Technology, Research Communications

Georgia Tech researchers used experiments and numerical calculations to show that iron, in the absence of oxygen, can substitute for magnesium in RNA binding, folding and catalysis. The findings suggest that 3 billion years ago, on the early earth, iron did the chemical work now done by magnesium.

Released:
30-May-2012 6:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    30-May-2012 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 589729

The Special Scent of Age

Monell Chemical Senses Center

New findings from the Monell Center reveal that humans can identify the age of other humans based on differences in body odor.

Released:
24-May-2012 3:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 589777

Earlier Detection of Bone Loss May Be in Future

Arizona State University (ASU)

Scientists at Arizona State University and NASA are developing a new approach to the medical challenge of detecting bone loss by applying a technique that originated in the Earth sciences. Their findings are presented in a paper published in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) the week of May 28, 2012.

Released:
29-May-2012 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 589769

High-Speed Method to Aid Search for Solar Energy Storage Catalysts

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Writing this week in the journal Angewandte Chemie, a Wisconsin group describes a new high-throughput method to identify electrocatalysts for water oxidation.

Released:
25-May-2012 3:10 PM EDT
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Article ID: 589713

From Lemons to Lemonade: Reaction Uses Carbon Dioxide to Make Carbon-Based Semiconductor

Michigan Technological University

Materials scientist Yun Hang Hu has discovered a chemical reaction that gobbles up the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide and produces a couple of useful compounds. And, by the way, it releases energy.

Released:
24-May-2012 12:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 589508

New Method Predicts Interaction Energy of Biomolecules Used for Drug Development

University of Delaware

Krzysztof Szalewicz, professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Delaware, and Rafal Podeszwa of the University of Silesia Institute of Chemistry in Poland have developed and validated a more accurate method for predicting the interaction energy of large molecules, such as biomolecules used to develop new drugs.

Released:
18-May-2012 7:30 AM EDT
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Article ID: 589504

Chemists Merge Experimentation with Theory in Understanding of Water Molecule

University of Virginia

Using newly developed imaging technology, University of Virginia chemist Brooks Pate and co-authors have confirmed years of theoretical assumptions about water molecules, the most abundant and one of the most frequently studied substances on Earth.

Released:
18-May-2012 7:00 AM EDT
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