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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Sep-2012 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 593639

Higher Levels of BPA in Children and Teens Significantly Associated With Obesity

NYU Langone Health

Researchers at NYU School of Medicine have revealed a significant association between obesity and children and adolescents with higher concentrations of urinary bisphenol A (BPA), a synthetic chemical recently banned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from sippy cups and baby bottles. Still, the chemical continues to be used in aluminum cans, such as those containing soda.

Released:
13-Sep-2012 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 593622

Chemists Develop Nose-Like Array to ‘Smell’ Cancer

University of Massachusetts Amherst

In the fight against cancer, knowing the enemy’s identity is crucial for diagnosis and treatment, especially in metastatic cancers that spread between organs and tissues. Now chemists have developed a rapid, sensitive way to detect microscopic levels of many metastatic cell types in living tissue.

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13-Sep-2012 12:20 PM EDT
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Article ID: 593603

Chemist Develops New Synthesis of Most Useful, Yet Expensive, Antimalarial Drug

Indiana University

In 2010 malaria caused an estimated 665,000 deaths, mostly among African children. Now, chemists at Indiana University have developed a new synthesis for the world's most useful antimalarial drug, artemisinin, giving hope that fully synthetic artemisinin might help reduce the cost of the live-saving drug in the future.

Released:
13-Sep-2012 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 593380

The Art of Chemistry

Keuka College

Art and science come together in a student photography exhibit at Keuka College.

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7-Sep-2012 12:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 593347

Biopsies May Ovelook Esophagus Disease

University of Utah

University of Utah engineers mapped white blood cells called eonsinophils and showed an existing diagnostic method may overlook an elusive digestive disorder that causes swelling in the esophagus and painful swallowing.

Released:
6-Sep-2012 4:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 593305

Undergraduates Aid Millsaps College Chemists in Analysis of ‘Black Drink’ Residue for Study Published in NAS Proceedings

Millsaps College

Chemical residues in prehistoric Native American ceramic vessels are believed to offer the earliest known evidence for black drink consumption. Undergraduate students worked with chemists at Millsaps College's Keck Center, the only archaeometric laboratory in the United States devoted exclusively to undergraduate research and study, to conduct the chemical analysis for the study.

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6-Sep-2012 9:00 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    2-Sep-2012 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 593204

Can’t Smell Anything? This Discovery May Give You Hope

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Scientists have restored the sense of smell in mice through gene therapy for the first time -- a hopeful sign for people who can’t smell anything from birth or lose it due to disease. The achievement in curing congenital anosmia may also aid research on other conditions that also stem from problems with the cilia.

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31-Aug-2012 4:10 PM EDT
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Article ID: 593153

Science Study Shows ‘Promiscuous’ Enzymes Still Prevalent in Metabolism

University of California San Diego

Open an undergraduate biochemistry textbook and you will learn that enzymes are highly efficient and specific in catalyzing chemical reactions in living organisms, and that they evolved to this state from their “sloppy” and “promiscuous” ancestors to allow cells to grow more efficiently. This fundamental paradigm is being challenged in a new study by bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego, who reported in the journal Science what a few enzymologists have suspected for years: many enzymes are still pretty sloppy and promiscuous, catalyzing multiple chemical reactions in living cells, for reasons that were previously not well understood.

Released:
30-Aug-2012 2:10 PM EDT
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Cell Biology, Chemistry

  • Embargo expired:
    23-Aug-2012 3:45 PM EDT

Article ID: 591936

“Smart Catheters” for the Major Problem of Catheter-Related Infections

American Chemical Society (ACS)

A new “smart catheter” that senses the start of an infection, and automatically releases an anti-bacterial substance, is being developed to combat the problem of catheter-related blood and urinary tract infections, scientists reported here today at the 244th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

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13-Aug-2012 1:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Aug-2012 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 592775

'Naked Darth Vader' Approach Could Tame Antibiotic Resistant Superbugs

Universite de Montreal

Rather than trying to kill bacteria outright with drugs, Université de Montréal researchers have discovered a way to disarm bacteria that may allow the body's own defense mechanisms to destroy them.

Released:
20-Aug-2012 12:00 PM EDT
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