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Cardiovascular Health

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Medicine

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Hypertension, High Blood Pressure, Diurectics, Calcium Channel Blocker, Ace Inhibitor, chlorthalidone, Amlodipine, Lisinopril, water pill, prinivil, Zestril, Norvasc

Expensive New Blood Pressure Meds No Better than Generics

Expensive brand-name medications to lower blood pressure are no better at preventing cardiovascular disease than older, generic diuretics, according to new long-term data from a landmark study.

Medicine

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Dr. Peter Okin, Heart Rate, Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute, Cardiolgy, L Band, Dr. Richard B. Devereux

Elevated Heart Rate Over Time Linked to Significant Risk of Death

An elevated resting heart rate that develops or persists during follow-up is associated with a significantly increased risk of death, whether from heart disease or other causes, researchers from the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center found studying outcomes in more than 9,000 patients.

Medicine

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Stroke, Cardiovascular Disease, Medication Adherence, Compliance, Secondary Prevention Program

One In Four Stroke Patients Stop Taking Prevention Medication Within Three Months

At least a quarter of patients who have suffered a stroke stop taking one or more of their prescribed stroke prevention medications within the first three months after being hospitalized – when the chance of having another stroke is highest – according to a new study by researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and colleagues.

Medicine

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Nationwide Children's Hospital, Spinal Muscular Atrophy, Center for Gene Therapy, Neurology

Spinal Muscular Atrophy May Also Affect the Heart

Along with skeletal muscles, it may be important to monitor heart function in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). These are the findings from a study conducted by Nationwide Children’s Hospital and published online ahead of print in Human Molecular Genetics. This is the first study to report cardiac dysfunction in mouse models of SMA.

Science

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Optical, American Institute Of Physics (Aip)

Optical Imaging Technique for Angioplasty

A new optical imaging technique described in the journal Review of Scientific Instruments holds the potential to greatly improve angioplasty, a surgery commonly performed to treat patients with a partially or completely blocked coronary artery that restricts blood flow to the heart.

Science

Channels:

Cardiac Arrest, Heart Attack, Heart Attack, Recovery from, Scaffolds, Biomedical Engineering, Polymer Chemistry, Rehabilitation Medicine

A Strategy to Fix a Broken Heart

Engineers and physicians at the University of Washington have built a scaffold that supports the growth and integration of stem cell-derived cardiac muscle cells. The scaffold supports the growth of cardiac cells in the lab and encourages blood vessel growth in living animals.

Medicine

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Cardiology, Aging, Immigrants, Migration, Minorities, Socioeconomic Status, Poverty And Wealth, Mexican Americans, African Americans, Blacks Hispanics

Cardiovascular Disease Risk Linked to Socioeconomic Status

New study suggests that disparities in cardiovascular disease risk in the United States are due less to race or ethnicity than to socioeconomic status.

Medicine

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Higher HDL-C Concentrations May Not Always Be a Good Measure of Heart Risk

Dr. Amar Sethi, VP of Science and Technology at Pacific Biomarkers, Inc, observed that in ischemic heart disease patients untreated with statins, there is a difference in the way bad cholesterol is removed from the body by the HDL particle. They found that a particle called pre-β1 HDL is increased, while LCAT—the enzyme that packs cholesterol into the core of the HDL particle—is reduced.

Medicine

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Vitamin D, Arterial Stiffness, Stroke, African Americans

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Arterial Stiffness in Black Teens

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with arterial stiffness, a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, in black teens according to a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). Black teens taking vitamin D supplementation of 2,000 international units (IU) per day had a decrease in central arterial stiffness.

Medicine

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Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, CPR, chest compressions, American Heart Association, Cardiac Arrest, Heart, Cardiology

CPR without Mouth-To-Mouth Rescue Breathing May be Better for Many Victims of Cardiac Arrest

A leading expert in cardiopulmonary resuscitation says two new studies from U.S. and European researchers support the case for dropping mouth-to-mouth, or rescue breathing by bystanders and using “hands-only” chest compressions during the life-saving practice, better known as CPR.







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