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Article ID: 609904

Repetition in Music Pulls Us In and Pulls Us Together

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

In On Repeat: How Music Plays the Mind, Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis of the University of Arkansas explores the psychology of repetition in music, across time, style and cultures.

Released:
4-Nov-2013 10:00 PM EST
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Arts and Humanities

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Article ID: 609900

Do You Want the Good News or the Bad News First?

University of California, Riverside

There’s good news and there’s bad news. Which do you want to hear first? That depends on whether you are the giver or receiver of bad news, and if the news-giver wants the receiver to act on the information, according to researchers at the University of California, Riverside.

Released:
4-Nov-2013 5:00 PM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 609761

Study on Incarcerated Youth Shows Potential to Lower Anti-Social Behavior and Recidivism

New York University

It is the first study to show that mindfulness training can be used in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy to protect attentional functioning in high-risk incarcerated youth.

Released:
31-Oct-2013 12:00 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 609622

News That Is Better or Worse Than Expected Influences Health Decisions

University of California, Riverside

Patients who are unrealistically optimistic about their personal health risks are more likely to take preventive action when confronted with news that is worse than expected, while unrealistic pessimists are less likely to change their behavior after receiving feedback that is better than expected.

Released:
29-Oct-2013 3:00 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 609588

Eyetrack Study Captures Men's -- and Women's -- Objectifying Gazes

University of Nebraska-Lincoln

A new study by UNL psychologists Sarah Gervais and Mike Dodd used eye-tracking technology to map the visual behavior of men and women as they looked at images of women with different body types.

Released:
29-Oct-2013 10:00 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    29-Oct-2013 4:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 609384

A Potential New Class of Fast-Acting Antidepressant

University of Chicago Medical Center

More than 1 in 10 Americans take antidepressants, but these medications can take weeks—and for some patients, months—before they begin to alleviate symptoms. Now, scientists from the University of Chicago have discovered that selectively blocking a serotonin receptor subtype induces fast-acting antidepressant effects in mice, indicating a potential new class of therapeutics for depression. The work was published Oct. 29 in Molecular Psychiatry.

Released:
24-Oct-2013 9:35 AM EDT
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Article ID: 609562

UT Dallas Study Shows Experts’ Attitudes Influence What Children Believe

University of Texas at Dallas

Children are more apt to believe a nice, non-expert than a mean expert according to researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas. In the study published in Developmental Science, the authors examine how preschoolers decide whom to believe when provided with two conflicting pieces of information given by a nice or mean adult.

Released:
28-Oct-2013 6:00 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    28-Oct-2013 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 609432

Nurturing May Protect Kids From Brain Changes Linked to Poverty

Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified changes in the brains of children growing up in poverty. Those changes can lead to lifelong problems like depression, learning difficulties and limitations in the ability to cope with stress. But the study showed that the extent of those changes was influenced strongly by whether parents were attentive and nurturing.

Released:
24-Oct-2013 5:45 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    28-Oct-2013 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 609449

One, Two, Buckle My Shoe

University of California San Diego

The language a child speaks affects the rate at which they learn number words, and hearing number words in natural conversation – not just in counting routines – is a critical part of learning the meaning of numbers.

Released:
25-Oct-2013 9:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 609504

Psychology Professor Says Superstitions All About Trying to Control Fate

Kansas State University

Halloween have you avoiding black cats, bats and more? A psychologist says superstitions are behaviors that people perform in an attempt to affect or control their future.

Released:
28-Oct-2013 10:10 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences


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