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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Sep-2014 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 622892

Co-Flowing Liquids Can Stabilize Chaotic “Whipping” in Microfluidic Jets

Georgia Institute of Technology

Wet spinning processes produce fibers using tiny needles to eject jets of liquid precursors. These liquids normally exhibit a chaotic “whipping” structure as they enter a secondary liquid that surrounds the microscopic jets. Researchers have now learned how to control that chaotic structure.

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5-Sep-2014 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 622966

Need for Authenticity Drives Gender Transitions in Later Life

Washington University in St. Louis

As we age, all of us begin to think about what makes us tick and what kind of legacy we want to leave. For some, this manifests itself in the purchase of a motorcycle, a boat or an exotic vacation. But for others, the issues of age and transition are a bit more contemplative. Vanessa Fabbre, PhD, assistant professor at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, considers these issues in her paper “Gender Transitions in Later Life: The Significance of Time in Queer Aging,” recently published in the 2014 print issue of the Journal of Gerontological Social Work.

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8-Sep-2014 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 622968

Live Fast, Die Young: Soil Microbes in a Warmer World

Northern Arizona University

The mortality of soil microbes in warmer temperatures may affect soil carbon storage.

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8-Sep-2014 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 622964

Toward a Theory of Child Well-Being

Washington University in St. Louis

For most of us, being healthy is more than lack of disease. It is a state of physical and mental well-being. But what is well-being? Can a comprehensive picture of well-being be established? And how can a deeper understanding of the nature of well-being help further its measurement? Ramesh Raghavan, MD, PhD, associate professor at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, and Anna Alexandrova, PhD, a philosopher of science at Cambridge University, attempt to tackle those questions in a recent paper titled “Toward a Theory of Child Well-Being.”

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8-Sep-2014 3:00 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 622962

‘Missouri Medicine’ Turns to SLU for Vaccine Research Insights

Saint Louis University Medical Center

Internationally recognized for vaccine research, Saint Louis University faculty wrote about their efforts to protect people from infectious diseases in Missouri Medicine, which is the journal of the Missouri state medical society.

Released:
8-Sep-2014 2:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Sep-2014 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 622799

Gobbling Up Poison: A Method for Killing Colon Cancer

Thomas Jefferson University

A new immunotoxin works by getting shuttled into cancer cells, selectively destroying colon cancer, thanks to a quirk of biology

Released:
4-Sep-2014 8:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Sep-2014 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 622810

Hog Workers Carry Drug-Resistant Bacteria Even After They Leave the Farm

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new study suggests that nearly half of workers who care for animals in large industrial hog farming operations may be carrying home livestock-associated bacteria in their noses, and that this potentially harmful bacteria remains with them up to four days after exposure.

Released:
4-Sep-2014 10:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Sep-2014 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 622857

UNC Researchers Find New Genetic Target for a Different Kind of Cancer Drug

University of North Carolina Health Care System

Human genes are spliced together in different ways to create various kinds of messenger RNA to produce the many proteins we require. UNC researcher Zefeng Wang, PhD, found a protein that controls how genes splice together, and it’s a protein that’s drastically decreased in cancers.

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4-Sep-2014 5:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 622948

Mysteries of Space Dust Revealed

Argonne National Laboratory

The first analysis of space dust collected by a special collector onboard NASA's Stardust mission and sent back to Earth for study in 2006 suggests the tiny specks open a door to studying the origins of the solar system and possibly the origin of life itself.

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8-Sep-2014 12:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 622944

Texas A&M Prof Helps To Develop New Device That Detects Radiation Better Than Ever

Texas A&M University

In a move that could have huge implications for national security, researchers have created a very sensitive and tiny detector that is capable of detecting radiation from various sources at room temperature. The detector is eight to nine orders of magnitude --100 million to as high as 1 billion -- times faster than the existing technology, and a Texas A&M University at Galveston professor is a key player in the discovery.

Released:
8-Sep-2014 11:00 AM EDT
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