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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Feb-2011 6:00 PM EST

Article ID: 573108

Air Pollutants from Fireplaces and Wood-Burning Stoves Raise Health Concerns

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Danish scientists, in a study published in American Chemical Society’s journal, Chemical Research in Toxicology, found that the invisible particles inhaled into the lungs from breathing wood smoke from fireplaces have multiple adverse effects.

Released:
4-Feb-2011 10:25 AM EST
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Article ID: 573036

Experiment Reaches Biology Breakthrough with Hard X-Ray Laser

Arizona State University College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

A pair of studies published Feb. 3 in Nature, detail a new method developed to determine structures of biomolecules based on diffraction from protein nanocrystals. The international team of nearly 90 researchers included 10 from Arizona State University, whose contributions included a protein beam injector and nanocrystals.

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3-Feb-2011 8:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 572950

Heads or Tails: Cells' Electricity Decides

Tufts University

Scientists have found that specific changes in cell membrane voltage and ion flow are key in determining if an organism regenerates a head or a tail. It was known that bioelectric signals can trigger the regeneration process, but no one had shown that these signals determine which part regenerates. This technique uses pharmacology to change voltage and does not rely on gene therapy.

Released:
1-Feb-2011 8:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 572904

DNA Caught Rock 'N Rollin'

University of Michigan

DNA, that marvelous, twisty molecule of life, has an alter ego, research at the University of Michigan and the University of California, Irvine reveals.

Released:
28-Jan-2011 3:30 PM EST
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Article ID: 572799

First Study of Dispersants in Gulf Spill Suggests a Prolonged Deepwater Fate

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

To combat last year’s Deepwater Horizon oil spill, nearly 800,000 gallons of chemical dispersant were injected directly into the oil and gas flow coming out of the wellhead nearly one mile deep in the Gulf of Mexico. Now, as scientists begin to assess how well the strategy worked at breaking up oil droplets, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) chemist Elizabeth B. Kujawinski and her colleagues report that a major component of the dispersant itself was contained within an oil-gas-laden plume in the deep ocean and had still not degraded some three months after it was applied.

Released:
26-Jan-2011 8:30 AM EST
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Article ID: 572743

International Year of Chemistry Video Explores a Day without Chemistry

American Chemical Society (ACS)

The American Chemical Society (ACS) entertainingly explores this unsettling premise of a world without chemistry in a new high-definition video released before the official launch of the International Year of Chemistry (IYC). A Day without Chemistry follows a person who sees more and more of his everyday necessities and conveniences disappear.

Released:
25-Jan-2011 12:10 PM EST
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Article ID: 572700

American Chemical Society Unveils International Year of Chemistry Calendar Contest

American Chemical Society (ACS)

The American Chemical Society (ACS) is offering students, teachers and others the chance to win monthly cash cards and grand prizes of an iPad, iPod Touch or iPod Nano in its “365: Chemistry for Life Contest,” celebrating the International Year of Chemistry (IYC).

Released:
24-Jan-2011 2:55 PM EST
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Article ID: 572687

Tailor-Made Enzymes Protect Against Nerve Gas

Weizmann Institute of Science

At the Weizmann Institute, an interdisciplinary team of scientists have used “natural selection” in a test tube to modify the PON1 enzyme so that it provides protection against nerve agents. This ability to tailor enzymes could be used to develop defensive treatments against all known nerve agents.

Released:
24-Jan-2011 12:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 572643

Use of Novel Peptide, ATAP, for Inducing Cancer Cell Death May be More Successful than Current Peptide-Based Therapies

Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Researchers from UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School have discovered a novel peptide that can act as a potent inducer of cancer cell death, which may have significant implications for therapeutic agents used to treat cancer. Their study indicates that the amphipathic tail-anchoring peptide, or ATAP, may provide more successful outcomes in cancer treatment than the BH3 peptide-based therapy currently used. The study was released online December 28, 2010, as a Paper of the Week in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Released:
20-Jan-2011 3:30 PM EST
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Article ID: 572635

Latest American Chemical Society Podcast: Biodegradable Foam from Milk Protein and Clay

American Chemical Society (ACS)

The latest episode in the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) award-winning podcast series, “Global Challenges/Chemistry Solutions,” focuses on development of a new ultra-light biodegradable foam plastic material made from two unlikely ingredients: The protein in milk and ordinary clay.

Released:
20-Jan-2011 12:25 PM EST
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