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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Feb-2013 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 599020

Cardiovascular Risk May Remain for Treated Cushing’s Disease Patients

Endocrine Society

Even after successful treatment, patients with Cushing’s disease who were older when diagnosed or had prolonged exposure to excess cortisol face a greater risk of dying or developing cardiovascular disease, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

Released:
8-Feb-2013 2:20 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Feb-2013 5:00 PM EST

Article ID: 598786

Genetic Variation Doubles Risk of Aortic Valve Calcification

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers have found a genetic variant that doubles the likelihood that people will have calcium deposits on their aortic valve. Such calcification, if it becomes severe, can cause narrowing or a blockage of the aortic valve, a condition called aortic stenosis. The study is the first large-scale, genome-wide association study to uncover a genetic link to aortic valve calcification. An article detailing the findings is published in the February 7, 2013 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

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4-Feb-2013 1:10 PM EST
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Article ID: 598906

GW Experts Available to Comment on Heart Health – February is American Heart Month

George Washington University

Released:
6-Feb-2013 12:15 PM EST
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Article ID: 598776

Doctors Available for February Heart Month

University of Maryland Medical Center/School of Medicine

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4-Feb-2013 1:25 PM EST
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Article ID: 598708

Cardiologist: Awareness Still Lacking of Seriousness of Heart Disease in Women

Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Although heart disease remains the No. 1 killer nationally for women—responsible for one out of every three deaths—many of today’s women still underestimate the seriousness of the disease and their risks, says Liliana Cohen, MD, a board-certified cardiologist with The Robert Wood Johnson Medical Group.

Released:
1-Feb-2013 10:30 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    31-Jan-2013 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 598437

More Links Found Between Schizophrenia and Cardiovascular Disease

University of California San Diego Health

A new study, to be published in the Feb. 7, 2013 issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics, expands and deepens the biological and genetic links between cardiovascular disease and schizophrenia. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of premature death among schizophrenia patients, who die from heart and blood vessel disorders at a rate double that of persons without the mental disorder.

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24-Jan-2013 3:50 PM EST
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Article ID: 598687

Family History Plays a Major Role in Heart Health

University of Alabama at Birmingham

If you exercise, eat right and don’t smoke, a history of heart disease in your family can still put you at risk – even if you are a female.

Released:
31-Jan-2013 12:00 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    30-Jan-2013 5:00 PM EST

Article ID: 598495

Setting the Stage for a New Paradigm in Treatment of Heart Failure

University of North Carolina Health Care System

New evidence shows the root of heart failure lies in misfolded proteins in the heart’s cells, according to University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers. The finding may pave the way for dramatically new treatment approaches.

Released:
28-Jan-2013 10:30 AM EST
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Article ID: 598426

Genes Provide Clues to Gender Disparity in Human Hearts

Washington University in St. Louis

Healthy men and women show little difference in their hearts, except for small electrocardiographic disparities. But new genetic differences found by Washington University in St. Louis researchers in hearts with disease could ultimately lead to personalized treatment of various heart ailments.

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24-Jan-2013 2:25 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jan-2013 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 598232

Longer CPR Improves Survival in Both Chidren and Adults

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Experts from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia were among the leaders of two large national studies showing that extending CPR longer than previously thought useful saves lives in both children and adults after in-hospital cardiac arrest.

Released:
18-Jan-2013 12:30 PM EST
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