Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

27312740 of 7507

Article ID: 657095

What Free Will Looks Like in the Brain

Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins University researchers are the first to glimpse the human brain making a purely voluntary decision to act.

Released:
13-Jul-2016 10:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
Ofen_BoyMemoryIllusbyJulianWong.jpg

Article ID: 657079

Wayne State researcher awarded $1.9M NIH grant to identify memory networks in children

Wayne State University Division of Research

Noa Ofen, Ph.D., a Wayne State University researcher in lifespan cognitive neuroscience, received a five-year, $1.9 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health to study the development of memory networks in children. Researchers will investigate brain activity predictive of memory formation in children who undergo surgery as part of clinical management of medically uncontrolled epilepsy.

Released:
12-Jul-2016 6:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
119568_web.jpg

Article ID: 657062

Help at Hand for People Watching Their Weight

University of Sydney

Researchers from the University of Sydney's Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders have developed a portable and easy-to-use method to help people estimate portion size using only their hands.

Released:
12-Jul-2016 3:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Social and Behavioral Sciences

119615_web.jpg

Article ID: 657047

Changes Uncovered in the Gut Bacteria of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

Brigham and Women’s Hospital

A connection between the bacteria living in the gut and immunological disorders such as multiple sclerosis have long been suspected, but for the first time, researchers have detected clear evidence of changes that tie the two together. Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have found that people with multiple sclerosis have different patterns of gut microorganisms than those of their healthy counterparts. In addition, patients receiving treatment for MS have different patterns than untreated patients. The new research supports recent studies linking immunological disorders to the gut microbiome and may have implications for pursuing new therapies for MS.

Released:
12-Jul-2016 2:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 657049

Driving Ability of People with Cognitive Impairment Difficult to Assess: Research Review

St. Michael's Hospital

No single assessment tool is able to consistently determine driving ability in people with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment, a St. Michael's Hospital research review has found.

Released:
12-Jul-2016 2:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 657005

Chad Carr Movement Accelerating Childhood Brain Cancer Research

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Chad Carr's memory lives on at Mott through research funded by a stream of donations to the ChadTough Fund at the University of Michigan and a recent research grant in Chad’s name from The V Foundation for Cancer Research.

Released:
12-Jul-2016 9:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    12-Jul-2016 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 654470

Abusive Head Injury: An Epidemiological Perspective

Journal of Neurosurgery

Researchers examined the case files of all patients younger than 5 years of age who had been admitted to Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital between 2009 and 2014 for abusive head injury. The authors’ goal was to identify patient demographics and determine the incidence and extent of the injuries, seasonal trends associated with this abuse, required neurosurgical procedures, and costs of hospitalization. The number of cases is on the rise,

Released:
5-Jul-2016 10:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
HANSComparison.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    12-Jul-2016 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 656583

Saving Racecar Drivers’ Lives

Journal of Neurosurgery

The authors recount how Dr. Robert Hubbard, a biomechanical crash engineer, and his brother-in-law, Jim Downing, a racecar driver, joined forces to create the HANS® device, which was designed to prevent the occurrence of shear injuries between the head and neck during high-impact crashes.

Released:
5-Jul-2016 9:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    11-Jul-2016 7:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 656742

Cancer Drug Restores Brain Dopamine, Reduces Toxic Proteins in Parkinson, Dementia

Georgetown University Medical Center

A small phase I study provides molecular evidence that an FDA-approved drug for leukemia significantly increased brain dopamine and reduced toxic proteins linked to disease progression in patients with Parkinson’s disease or dementia with Lewy bodies.

Released:
7-Jul-2016 7:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 656983

Scientists Identify Neurochemical Signal Likely Missing in Parkinson’s

Northwestern University

Two Northwestern University neuroscientists have identified the neurochemical signal likely missing in Parkinson’s disease by being the first to discover two distinctly different kinds of neurons that deliver dopamine to an important brain region responsible for both movement and learning/reward behavior. The findings provide a new framework for understanding the role of the dopamine system in movement control and learning/reward and how dysfunction of the dopamine system can result in a range of neurological disorders.

Released:
11-Jul-2016 4:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Showing results

27312740 of 7507





Chat now!