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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Mar-2014 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 615032

One in Three Patients with Bloodstream Infections Given Inappropriate Therapy

Duke Health

Growing drug resistance, a high prevalence of S. aureus bacteria and ineffective antibiotics prescribed to one in three patients are among the challenges facing community hospitals in treating patients with serious bloodstream infections, according to researchers at Duke Medicine.

Released:
13-Mar-2014 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 615242

Study Finds No Evidence That Vitamin D Supplements Reduce Depression

Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated in numerous health conditions in recent years, including depressed mood and major depressive disorder. Recent observational studies provide some support for an association of vitamin D levels with depression, but the data do not indicate whether vitamin D deficiency causes depression or vice versa. These studies also do not examine whether vitamin D supplementation improves depression.

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18-Mar-2014 4:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 615237

Stimulants Used to Treat ADHD Influence BMI Growth Patterns Through Childhood With a BMI Rebound in Late Adolescence

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that children treated with stimulants for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) experienced slower body mass index (BMI) growth than their undiagnosed or untreated peers, followed by a rapid rebound of BMI that exceeded that of children with no history of ADHD or stimulant use and that could continue to obesity.

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18-Mar-2014 2:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 615220

Joint Cancer Center Study Finds Barriers to Minority Clinical Trial Participation

UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center

A new study involving researchers from UC Davis and four other National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers reveals important barriers that limit minority group participation in cancer clinical trials, findings that will be used to refine and launch more effective strategies to assure that more minorities benefit from clinical trials.

Released:
18-Mar-2014 1:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 615219

Minority Clinical Trials Participation and Analysis Still Lag 20 Years After Federal Mandate

UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center

Twenty years after Congress mandated that research funded by the National Institutes of Health include minorities, less than 5 percent of trials participants are non-white, and less than 2 percent of clinical cancer research studies focus on non-white ethnic or racial groups, UC Davis researchers have found.

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18-Mar-2014 1:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 615216

Strongest Evidence Yet of Two Distinct Human Cognitive Systems

University at Buffalo

Cognitive scientists may have produced the strongest evidence yet that humans have separate and distinct cognitive systems with which they can categorize, classify, and conceptualize their worlds.

Released:
18-Mar-2014 1:10 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 615221

Online Ratings Don’t Help Patients Compare Hospitals

Health Behavior News Service

Despite having access to online ratings, patients can’t distinguish the quality or performance of one hospital from another, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Released:
18-Mar-2014 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 615206

Escaping Poor Neighborhoods Can Change a Parent's Expectations

Johns Hopkins University

Despite evidence that people don’t leave impoverished, segregated areas even when offered large housing subsidies, a well-structured voucher program can help inner city residents feel comfortable enough in a more affluent area to want to stay, researchers found.

Released:
18-Mar-2014 12:00 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 615201

UT Southwestern Cardiologists Define New Heart Failure Symptom: Shortness of Breath While Bending Over

UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists have defined a novel heart failure symptom in advanced heart failure patients: shortness of breath while bending over, such as when putting on shoes.

Released:
18-Mar-2014 11:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Mar-2014 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 615076

New View of Supernova Death Throes

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

A powerful, new three-dimensional model provides fresh insight into the turbulent death throes of supernovas, whose final explosions outshine entire galaxies and populate the universe with elements that make life on Earth possible. Described in AIP Advances, it shows how the turbulent mixing of elements inside stars causes them to expand, contract, and spit out matter before they finally detonate.

Released:
14-Mar-2014 10:00 AM EDT
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