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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Nov-2013 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 610255

Brain Still Injured from Concussion After Symptoms Fade

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

After a mild concussion, special brain scans show evidence of brain abnormalities four months later, when symptoms from the concussion have mostly dissipated, according to research published in the November 20, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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12-Nov-2013 2:55 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Nov-2013 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 610524

Brain Abnormalities Linked to Impaired Self-Awareness in Cocaine Addiction

Mount Sinai Health System

New research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai reveals long-term cocaine abuse may be associated with deficits in parts of the brain involved in monitoring and overseeing one’s own behavior.

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18-Nov-2013 4:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 610670

AANEM Accredits First Overseas Electrodiagnostic Laboratory

American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM)

On November 6, 2013, the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center received accreditation with exemplary status through the AANEM Electrodiagnostic Laboratory Accreditation Program. This is the first EDX laboratory outside of the U.S. to receive gold standard status.

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20-Nov-2013 3:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 610666

Great White Shark Study Uncovers Unexpected and Distinctive Features

Nova Southeastern University

A new study by scientists from Nova Southeastern University’s (NSU) Save Our Seas Shark Research Centre and Cornell University published in final form today in the journal BMC Genomics now undertakes the first large-scale exploration of the great white shark’s genetic repertoire, and comes up with unexpected findings.

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20-Nov-2013 2:10 PM EST
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Article ID: 610662

Aging Impacts Epigenome in Human Skeletal Muscle

Buck Institute for Research on Aging

Our epigenome is a set of chemical switches that turn parts of our genome off and on and are impacted by environmental factors including diet, exercise and stress. Research at the Buck Institute reveals that aging also effects the epigenome in human skeletal muscle. The study provides a method to study sarcopenia, the degenerative loss of muscle mass that begins in middle age.

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20-Nov-2013 2:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 610659

Skeletal Remains Of 24,000-Year-Old Boy Raise New Questions About First Americans

Texas A&M University

Results from a DNA study of a young boy’s skeletal remains believed to be 24,000 years old could turn the archaeological world upside down – it’s been proven that nearly 30 percent of modern Native American’s ancestry came from this youngster’s gene pool, suggesting First Americans came directly from Siberia.

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20-Nov-2013 1:50 PM EST
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Article ID: 610654

Sudden Steep Drop in Blood Pressure on Standing From Lying Down May Predict Atrial Fibrillation Years Later

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Results of a Johns Hopkins-led study have identified a possible link between a history of sudden drops in blood pressure and the most common form of irregular heartbeat.

Released:
20-Nov-2013 1:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Nov-2013 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 610410

“Undruggable” Mutation Meets Its Match

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers at the University of California, San Francisco have identified and exploited a newfound “Achilles heel” in K-Ras, the most commonly mutated oncogene in human cancers. K-Ras has earned a reputation as being “undruggable” because scientific researchers have failed to design a drug that successfully targets the mutant gene. The weak point is a newly discovered “pocket,” or binding site, identified by HHMI investigator Kevan M. Shokat and colleagues. Shokat and his team have designed a chemical compound that fits inside this pocket and inhibits the normal activity of mutant K-Ras, but leaves the normal protein untouched.

Released:
14-Nov-2013 5:00 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Nov-2013 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 610496

Metabolically Healthy Obesity Does Not Guarantee Clean Bill of Health

Endocrine Society

Obese people who are currently metabolically healthy face a higher risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease, according to new research accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Released:
18-Nov-2013 11:50 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Nov-2013 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 610499

Excessive Testosterone Raises Mortality Risk in Older Men

Endocrine Society

Older men whose testosterone levels were neither low nor high tended to live longer, according to new research accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Released:
18-Nov-2013 1:00 PM EST
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