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Caterpillars, Insects, Cannibalism, Plants, Food

Plants Under Attack Can Turn Hungry Caterpillars Into Cannibals

When does a (typically) vegetarian caterpillar become a cannibalistic caterpillar, even when there is still plenty of plant left to eat? When the tomato plant it’s feeding on makes cannibalism the best option. “It often starts with one caterpillar biting another one in the rear, which then oozes. And it goes downhill from there,” says University of Wisconsin–Madison integrated biology Professor John Orrock.

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Chinese Enterprises Commit to Wildlife Conservation in Uganda

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At a landmark forum co-hosted by the China Enterprise Chamber of Commerce Uganda (CECCU) and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), CECCU declared that Chinese enterprises operating in Uganda would support wildlife conservation.

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Ocean, Bacteria, Marine Bacteria, Marine Biology, heterotroph, phototrophic bacteria, Ecosystem, Carbon, Energy, Sea

Bacteria Collaborate to Propel the Ocean ‘Engine’

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Essential microbiological interactions that keep our oceans stable have been fully revealed for the first time, by researchers at the University of Warwick.

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Painted Jezebel , Delias, Evolution

NUS Study: Painted Jezebel Butterflies Deter Predators with Flashy Wing Colours

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A research team from the National University of Singapore has unraveled the mystery behind the wing colours of the Painted Jezebel, a common butterfly found in urban and forested landscapes throughout the Asia-Pacific region, known for its bright yellow and red wing colours.

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fire, industrial farming, Grasslands, James Randerson

UCI: Earth Is Losing Its Fire Power

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The world’s open grasslands and the beneficial fires that sustain them have shrunk rapidly over the past two decades, thanks to a massive increase in agriculture, according to a new study led by University of California, Irvine and NASA researchers published today in Science.

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biodiversity gradient, Smithsonian Institution, CTFS-ForestGEO network, soil pathogens

Global Forest Network Cracks the Case of Tropical Biodiversity

Why does biodiversity grade from exuberance at the equator through moderation at mid-latitudes toward monotony at higher ones? Data from an international network of long-term forest dynamics research sites is finally providing an answer.

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Killer Whales, Orcas, Reproduction, Endangered Species, Nutrition, Ecology, Marine Mammal

Study Shows High Pregnancy Failure in Southern Resident Killer Whales; Links to Nutritional Stress and Low Salmon Abundance

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A multi-year survey of the health of endangered southern resident killer whales suggests that up to two-thirds of pregnancies failed in this population from 2007 to 2014. The study links this orca population's low reproductive success to stress brought on by low abundance of Chinook salmon.

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visual systems, Perceptual Systems, Psychology, Camouflage, Nature, University Of Texas At Austin

New Research Could Help Humans See What Nature Hides

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Things are not always as they appear. New visual perception research at The University of Texas at Austin, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, explains the natural limits of what humans can see and how to find what nature hides.

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Talking Turtles II: WCS Discovers More Turtles That Talk

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Scientists from WCS and other groups have found that the pig-nosed turtle (Carettochelys insculpta) has joined a select group of chatty chelonians that can vocalize.

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Detecting Diluteness

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Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis and Princeton University developed a new way to dive into the cell's tiniest and most important components. What they found inside membraneless organelles surprised them, and could lead to better understanding of fatal diseases including cancer, Huntington's and ALS.







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