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Memory Takes Time, Researchers Conclude

How short-term memories become long-term ones has frequently been explored by researchers. While a definitive answer remains elusive, NYU scientists Thomas Carew and Nikolay Kukushkin conclude that this transformation is best explained by a “temporal hierarchy” of “time windows” that collectively alter the state of the brain.

Medicine

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ALS, Sibm, Neurodegenative Disease, Neurology

ALS: New Clues to the Cause and How Future Drugs Might Reverse Disease

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The protein TDP-43 is thought to cause muscle degeneration in patients with ALS. UNC and NC State researchers found that a specific chemical modification promotes TDP-43 clumping in animals. In muscle cells, scientists reversed protein clumping and prevented the sIBM-related muscle weakness.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Blood Test, Amyloid Beta

Blood Test IDs Key Alzheimer’s Marker

A new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that measures of amyloid beta in the blood have the potential to help identify people with altered levels of amyloid in their brains or cerebrospinal fluid. Currently, the only way to detect amyloid beta in the brain is via PET scanning or a spinal tap.

Medicine

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Neurosurgery, Neuroscience, Gliobastoma, Brain Tumor, Glioma stem cells, NEK2, EZH2, MELK, Stat3, Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Breast Cancer

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Jul-2017 4:00 PM EDT

Medicine

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golden hour, University of Birmingham, UK, head, Trauma, Injury, Hospital

‘Golden Hour’ Study Details Earliest Changes to the Immune System After Trauma

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Scientists from the University of Birmingham are carrying out pioneering research as part of a major £10 million study aimed at improving outcomes for patients who have suffered a traumatic injury.

Medicine

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neuroendocrine cancers, Neuroendocrine Tumors, cancer advances, new cancer treatment, new cancer drug

Rush is First in Illinois to Offer PRRT

Illinois patients with metastatic neuroendocrine cancer no longer have to travel abroad or out of state for a sought-after targeted therapy called peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, or PRRT. Rush University Medical Center in Chicago is one of the few health care providers in the United States, and the first in Illinois, authorized to offer this therapy for a limited number of patients prior to U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Well Being, happiness and wellbeing research

Case Grows for Link Between Happiness and Health

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In the most comprehensive review to date of studies on subjective well-being, a team of researchers conclude there is a connection between happiness and health in some instances — from better wound healing and immune system function to emotional resilience. The researchers say what’s needed now is more work to unravel when, how and what types of subjective well-being are most influential.

Medicine

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Epilepsy, Imaging, MRI, biomarkers

Epilepsy biomarkers pave way for noninvasive diagnosis, better treatments

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Researchers have identified a unique metabolic signature associated with epileptic brain tissue that causes seizures. It will allow physicians to precisely identify small regions of abnormal brain tissue in early-stage epilepsy patients that can’t be detected today using current technology.

Medicine

Science

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Microbiome, Brain Development, Biological Psychiatry, baby

In Baby's Dirty Diapers, the Clues to Baby's Brain Development

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Can the kinds of microbes colonizing the gut at age 1 predict later cognitive development? Findings from the UNC School of Medicine shed light on the surprising role of bacteria in how our brains develop during the first years of life.

Medicine

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University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Penn Nursing Science, Penn Nursing, Sara Jacoby, Terry Richmond, injury science, Trauma

Penn Nursing, Medicine Study: Standardized Policies Needed for How and When Police Interact with Trauma Patients

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Injured people often interact with police and other law enforcement agents before and during their injury care, particularly when their injuries are due to violence or major motor vehicle crashes. Yet, there are no professional guidelines in trauma medicine or nursing that standardize when and how police interact with injured patients.







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