Feature Channels:

Cell Biology

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Drug Resistance, Breast Cancer, Cancer Diagnosis, Microscopy, Cancer Research

A Swell Diagnostic Method

Ludwig researchers show how a method that physically expands tissues can improve early breast cancer diagnostics and extend the capabilities of ordinary pathology labs

Medicine

Channels:

Pathology, Expansion, Precancerous, Breast, Breast Cancer, Lesions, precancerous le, Kidney Disease, minimal change disease, Podocyte, light microscopy, scanning electron microscope

New Way to Enlarge Tissues Gives Pathologists a Closer Look at Cells

Investigators from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed and tested an innovative, reliable means of analyzing pre-cancerous breast lesions diagnosing certain kidney diseases and using only a conventional light microscope. The technique – dubbed “expansion pathology or ExPath – enhances pathologists’ diagnostic ability and could mean earlier interventions for high-risk patients. The research team describes their joint effort in a paper published today in the journal Nature Biotechnology.

Medicine

Channels:

Brain, Brain Activity Imaging, Depresion, Neural Activity, neuro circuits

New Study of Brain Circuits Finds Key Links to Symptoms of Depression

VPimagedk.jpg

Scientists have linked specific wiring in the brain to distinct behavioral symptoms of depression. In a study published in Cell, researchers at UC San Diego found brain circuits tied to feelings of despair and helplessness and were able to alleviate and even reverse such symptoms in mice studies.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Jeffrey Mumm, eye, Immune System, Zebrafish

Immune System Found to Control Eye Tissue Renewal in Zebrafish

Dorsalv2-usethisoneinPRJPEG.jpg

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report evidence that zebrafishes’ natural ability to regenerate their eyes’ retinal tissue can be accelerated by controlling the fishes’ immune systems. Because evolution likely conserved this mechanism of regenerative potential in other animals, the new findings may one day advance efforts to combat degenerative eye disease damage in humans.

Life

Education

Channels:

Big Data, Biology, Monterey, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, California State University

CSUMB Receives Grant to Enhance Bio Curriculum; Will Incorporate Big Data

SEASIDE, Calif., July 17, 2017 – California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB) has received a grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation that will help modernize how biology is taught at CSUMB.

Medicine

Channels:

Glaucoma Recovery, Corneal Inflammation, IRD Trial, and More in the Vision News Source

The latest research and feature news on vision in the Vision News Source

Science

Business

Channels:

Wearable Tech, Concrete Life, Speeding up the Catalysts, and More in the Engineering News Source

The latest research and features in the Newswise Engineering News Source

Medicine

Channels:

Most Wired Hospitals, Training with the NFL, Parent/Doctor Relationship, and More in the Healthcare News Source

The latest research, features and announcements in healthcare in the Healthcare News Source

Medicine

Channels:

Biomedical Engineering, Stem Cell, Substrate

Advance Furthers Stem Cells for Use in Drug Discovery, Cell Therapy

Array.jpg

UW-Madison researchers have invented an all-chemical replacement for the confusing, even dangerous materials, now used to grow stem cells.

Medicine

Channels:

triple-negative breast cancer, Resistance, Anti-viral

Cancer Cells Force Normal Cells to Mimic Viruses to Help Tumors Spread, Resist Treatment

In a study that could explain why some breast cancers are more aggressive than others, researchers say they now understand how cancer cells force normal cells to act like viruses – allowing tumors to grow, resist treatment, and spread. The virus mimic is detected in the blood of cancer patients, particularly in cases of an aggressive type known as triple-negative breast cancer. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania say cracking the code of how this process works opens up the possibility of targeting this mechanism for treatment.







Chat now!