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Two Missing World War II B-25 Bombers Documented by Project Recover Off Papua New Guinea

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Two B-25 bombers associated with American servicemen missing in action from World War II were recently documented in the waters off Papua New Guinea by Project Recover—a collaborative team of marine scientists, archaeologists and volunteers who have combined efforts to locate aircraft and associated MIAs from World War II.

Medicine

Science

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Paleontology, Evolution, Human Evolution, Fossils, Australopithecus afarensis, Zeray Alemseged, Paleoanthropology

3.3 Million-Year-Old Fossil Reveals Origins of the Human Spine

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Analysis of a 3.3 million-year-old fossil skeleton reveals the most complete spinal column of any early human relative, including vertebrae, neck and rib cage. The findings, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, indicate that portions of the human spinal structure that enable efficient walking motions were established millions of years earlier than previously thought.

Science

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Archaelology, Climate Change, GIS model

Canadian Archaeologists Challenge the Credibility of GIS Methods to Assess the Impact of Weather on Shoreline Erosion

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Although computer models of archaeological sites are commonly used to yield insights which contribute to the protection of heritage materials, scientists often question their credibility, calling for these long-term trends be ‘ground truthed’ in order to ensure that calculated rates of change reflect observed phenomena ‘in the field’.

Medicine

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Human Evolution, Human Migrations, Rickets, Vitamin D Deficiency, Dentin, Tooth, Teeth, Anthropology

Human Teeth Carry Secrets That Tell the Story of Humanity Through Our Fragile Relationship with the Sun

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The story of humanity’s vital – and fragile – relationship with the sun has been locked inside our teeth for hundreds of thousands of years. A new method is starting to tease out answers to major questions of evolution and migration, using clues hidden just under the enamel.

Science

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Archaelology, Anthropology, Homo naledi, Human Ancestors

South African Cave Yields Yet More Fossils of a Newfound Relative

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Probing deeper into the South African cave system known as Rising Star, which last year yielded the largest cache of hominin fossils known to science, an international team of researchers has discovered another chamber with more remains of a newfound human relative, Homo naledi. The discovery of the new fossils representing the remains of at least three juvenile and adult specimens includes a “wonderfully complete skull,” says University of Wisconsin-Madison anthropologist John Hawks.

Life

Arts and Humanities, Education

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Guggenheim Fellowships, Guggenheim Fellow, Skidmore College, Archaeologist, ancient Mesoamerica, Maya murals , Maya culture

Skidmore College Professor Honored with Prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship

Skidmore College faculty member and alumna is honored with prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship, Associate Professor Heather Hurst is one of 173 scholars, artists, and scientists chosen for the 2017 Guggenheim Award from nearly 3,000 applicants. Hurst’s specialization in ancient Mesoamerica research and her interdisciplinary work involving archaeologists, materials scientists, conservators, and art historians has contributed to cultural heritage preservation in the study of Maya culture.

Science

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polluted water, Chesapeake Bay, Chesapeake oysters, Environment

Chesapeake Bay Pollution Extends to Early 19th Century

Humans began measurably and negatively impacting water quality in the Chesapeake Bay in the first half of the 19th century, according to a study of eastern oysters by researchers at The University of Alabama.

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Wichita State University Professor, Students Continue Research on Archaeological Discovery

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Donald Blakeslee, professor of archaeology at Wichita State University, presented in March at the annual conference of the Society for American Archaeology discussing recent archaeological evidence that shows a thriving ancestral Wichita Indian town of more than 20,000 residents near Arkansas City, Kansas.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Living Dead, Historic England, University of Southampton, Alistair Pike, Wharram Percy

New Archaeological Evidence Throws Light on Efforts to Resist ‘the Living Dead’

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A new scientific study of medieval human bones, excavated from a deserted English village, suggests the corpses they came from were burnt and mutilated. Researchers from the University of Southampton and Historic England believe this was carried out by villagers who believed that it would stop the corpses rising from their graves and menacing the living.

Science

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Archaeology, Anthropology, hunter-gatherer, Domestication, Jordan Valley, Maasai, mice

Mouse in the House Tells Tale of Human Settlement

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Long before the advent of agriculture, hunter-gatherers began putting down roots in the Middle East, building more permanent homes and altering the ecological balance in ways that allowed the common house mouse to flourish, new research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences indicates.Findings suggest the roots of animal domestication go back to human sedentism thousands of years prior to what has long been considered the dawn of agriculture.







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