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Biology, Genetics, Internal Medicine, Public Health, Diseases In Developing World, infectious and emerging disease, pharmaceutial science

50-Year-Old Flu Virus Model Gets Facelift

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The scientific textbook depiction of the flu virus is about to get a facelift, due to a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine team’s discovery that a model of the influenza genome architecture untouched since the 1970s isn’t so perfect after all. The finding could give scientists the opportunity to better predict pandemics and find new ways to disrupt the flu virus.

Medicine

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Autism, eye tracking, genetic, Twin Studies

In Autism, Genes Drive Eye Gaze Abnormalities

Using eye-tracking technology, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta have found compelling evidence that genetics plays a major role in how children look at the world and whether they have a preference for gazing at people’s eyes and faces or at objects. The discovery adds new detail to understanding the causes of autism spectrum disorder. Studying twins, the researchers found that where babies focus their eyes is under stringent genetic control.

Medicine

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Mount Sinai Health System, Theragene Pharmaceuticals, Gene Therapy, Pulmonary Hypertension, Roger Hajjar, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Breathing in a New Gene Therapy to Treat Pulmonary Hypertension

Mount Sinai has partnered with Theragene Pharmaceuticals, Inc. to advance a novel airway-delivered gene therapy for treating pulmonary hypertension (PH), a form of high blood pressure in blood vessels in the lungs that is linked to heart failure.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Frontotemporal Dementia, genetic, 23andMe

Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Testing Can Be a Trip Down the Rabbit Hole

Anyone can learn whether they carry mutations known to cause Alzheimer’s, frontotemporal dementia, and other fatal neurodegenerative diseases.

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New Analysis of Rare Argentinian Rat Unlocks Origin of the Largest Mammalian Genome

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New biological information gleaned from the red vizcacha rat, a native species of Argentina, demonstrates how genomes can rapidly change in size. Researchers from McMaster University set out to study this particular species because its genome, or its complete set of DNA, is the largest of all mammals, and appears to have increased in size very rapidly.

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Synthetic DNA-Based Zika Vaccine Protects Against Damage to Testes in Preclinical Models

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While the Zika virus is primarily transmitted by mosquitoes, research has shown that the disease can affect semen and sperm and can therefore be spread through sexual intercourse.

Medicine

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Michael Polydefkis, amyloidosis, Transthyretin, Genetic Disease, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy

Faster Diagnosis of Inherited and Lethal Nerve Disease Could Advance Search for New Treatments

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Johns Hopkins physicians report success in a small study of a modified skin biopsy that hastens the earlier diagnosis of an inherited and progressively fatal nerve disease and seems to offer a clearer view of the disorder’s severity and progression. With a quicker and less invasive way to visualize the hallmark protein clumps of the rare but lethal disease — familial transthyretin amyloidosis — the researchers say they hope to more rapidly advance clinical trials of treatments that may slow the disease and extend patients’ lives.

Medicine

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Uniformed Services University Of The Health Sciences, uniformed services univer, galectin-3, Tuberous Sclerosis, Nhlbi, eLife, lymphangioleiomyomatosis , National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, TSC1, TSC2, Dr. Peter Klover, Dr. Thomas Darling, Dr. Joel Moss, National Institutes of Health, National Institutes Of Health (NIH), National Institute Of Arth

Heart Failure Biomarker Linked to Rare Genetic Tumor-Causing Diseases

Galectin-3, a protein that promotes cancer cell growth and is used as a biomarker for heart failure, has been linked to tumors observed in two rare genetic diseases, according to a study published July 11, 2017, in eLife

Medicine

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Sperm, sperm development

Single Protein Controls Genetic Network Essential for Sperm Development

Scientists have found a single protein—Ptbp2—controls a network of over 200 genes central to how developing sperm move and communicate. The protein works by regulating how RNA is processed during each stage of sperm development.

Science

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Bacteria defense, CRISPR, Cell DNA, Genetic Engineering, Molecular Biology, Genetics, Cornell University, Harvard Medical School

Bringing Bacteria’s Defense Into Focus

By taking a series of near-atomic resolution snapshots, Cornell University and Harvard Medical School scientists have observed step-by-step how bacteria defend against foreign invaders such as bacteriophage, a virus that infects bacteria.







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