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Couples 'Money-Talk' Curriculum, Online Interest in Sex Rises at Christmas, Male Virgins Can Still Get HPV, and More in the Sex and Relationships News Source

The latest research and features on sex in the Sex and Relationships News Source

Medicine

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Diet Rich in Apples and Tomatoes May Help Repair Lungs of Ex-Smokers, Study Suggests

A study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found the natural decline in lung function over a 10-year period was slower among former smokers with a diet high in tomatoes and fruits, especially apples, suggesting certain components in these foods might help restore lung damage caused by smoking.

Medicine

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Cancer, Carcinogens, Poison, Counseling, Addiction, Smoking Cessation, Pulmonology, Public Health, Toxicology, Pharmaceuticals

Study: Medications Alone Don’t Help Smokers Quit

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Pharmaceutical interventions are routinely prescribed to help people quit smoking. However, a new study by University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers suggests that, despite promising results in clinical trials, smoking cessation drugs alone may not be improving the chances of successful quitting among smokers in general.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Smoking, Smoking Cessation, quit smoking, quit smoking for good, quit smoking for new year, quit smoking tips, New Year Resolutions

Quit Smoking in the New Year with Help From Rutgers

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Are you trying to quit smoking in the New Year? According to The Tobacco Dependence Program at Rutgers University, most people who smoke regret having started and want to stop. However, quitting can be hard to do. Rutgers outlines the top ten things smokers and their families should know when going through the quitting smoking process--right in time for New Year’s resolutions.

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Researchers Discover Key Link Between Mitochondria and Cocaine Addiction

Researchers have identified significant mitochondrial changes that take place in cocaine addiction, and they blocked them.

Medicine

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Opioid Abuse Epidemic, opioid abuse, opiod dependancy, neonatal abstinence syndrome, newborn addiction, Newborn Drug Exposure

UNH Research Finds Increase in Number of Babies Born Drug Exposed in N.H.

From 2005 to 2015 the number of infants diagnosed with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in the Granite State increased fivefold, from 52 to 269, according to new research by the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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opioid abuse, Opioid, Addiction

No Family Is Immune to Addiction, but Members Can Take Steps to Help a Substance Abuser

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Opioid Tapering

Study Explores Patient-Doctor Communication About Opioid Tapering

Increased scrutiny of opioid prescribing for patients with chronic pain has led providers and healthcare organizations to consider opioid-dose reductions, known as tapering. Such actions can precipitate communication challenges for primary-care physicians. A new study, published in The Journal of Pain, examined patient-doctor conversations and explored best practices associated with opioid tapering. The Journal of Pain is the peer-review publication of the American Pain Society, www.americanpainsociety.org.

Medicine

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Neurosceince, genetics and addiction, Golgi, Inserm

UCI Geneticist Emiliana Borrelli Receives Prestigious European Honors

This fall, UCI's Emiliana Borrelli was awarded the title of Knight in the Order of the “Légion d’Honneur,” the most prestigious civilian honor given by the French government, received the prestigious Golgi Medal Award in Neuroscience from the Golgi Foundation at a ceremony in Brescia, Italy.

Medicine

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cancer genetics, dara aisner, LCMC, lung cancer, Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium, lung cancer targeted treatment, university of colorado cancer center

Even Smokers May Benefit From Targeted Lung Cancer Treatments

When a targetable genetic alteration is present, matching the alteration with the appropriate targeted therapy is associated with a survival benefit of 1.5 years, regardless of smoking history.







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