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Infectious Diseases

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Medicine

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Antibiotic Resistance, Multidrug Resistance, Bacteria, Nursing Homes, Urinary Tract Infection (UTI), Healthcare Associated Infections

“Superbug” Bacteria Gang Up on US, Fueled by Antibiotic Use, Nursing Home Study Suggests

What’s worse than getting exposed to a kind of bacteria that modern antibiotics can’t kill? Getting exposed to more than one – because they may work together to cause an infection, new research suggests. It’s time to think about such bacteria as members of an antibiotic-resistant ecosystem in healthcare environments – not as single species.

Medicine

Science

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San Diego, Palm Beach Florida, The Scripps Research Institute, Hiv Vaccine

TSRI Study Reveals New Clues to How a Successful HIV Vaccine Could Work

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have made a discovery that could speed efforts to develop a successful HIV vaccine.

Medicine

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Ribosomes

SLU Researcher Discovers How Hibernating Ribosomes Wake Up

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Saint Louis University scientist Mee-Ngan F. Yap, Ph.D.,has uncovered the way a bacterial ribosome moves from an inactive to an active form, and how that "wake up call" is key to its survival.

Medicine

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Checking Your Neck, Colon Cancer Screening, New Microfluidic Device, and More in the Cancer News Source

Click here to go directly to the Cancer News Source

Science

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sepsis early warning and response tool , Sepsis, sepsis prediction , microfluidic systems, CD64, Immune Response, Blood Infection, presymptomatic detection, POCTRN, POC, Point Of Care, Point Of Care Diagnostics

Microfluidic Chip Rapidly IDs Deadly Blood Infection

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Biomedical engineers have developed a microfluidic test that could enable rapid diagnosis and early intervention for sepsis, which accounts for the most deaths and medical expenses in hospitals worldwide.

Medicine

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Children's Anxiety, Thriving After Cancer, Unnecessary Antibiotics, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

Medicine

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Sinus Infection, Rhinosinusitis, sweet taste receptor, Amino Acid, Otorhinolaryngology, ENT

Blocking Sweet Taste Receptors Can Help Body Fight Off Sinus Infections

Sweet taste receptor, known as T1R, can be activated by certain amino acids secreted by bacteria. Researchers took cells from rhinosinusitis patients and isolated the various communities of bacteria that were present. They found cultures of Staphylococcus bacteria produced two D-amino acids called D-Phe and D-Leu, both of which activate T1R sweet receptors and block the release of antimicrobial peptides.

Medicine

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HCV, Kidney Disease

HCV Treatment Found Safe and Effective in Individuals with Kidney Disease

• In patients with chronic kidney disease and Hepatitis C virus infection, sofosbuvir-based direct-acting antiviral therapy was safe and effective. • Patients with stage 3 kidney disease who were cured of infection experienced an improvement in their kidney function following treatment.

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Adding Modified Herpes Virus to Immunotherapy Shows Promise for Treating Advanced Melanoma

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In a two-year study at UCLA, nearly two-thirds of people with advanced melanoma responded positively to a treatment that combines the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab with a herpes virus called talimogene laherpareovec, or T-VEC. Researchers led by Dr. Antoni Ribas found that the treatment's side effects were manageable, and comparable to side effects for people who took either pembrolizumab or T-VEC as a standalone treatment.

Medicine

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Dermatology, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Vitamin D, mustard gas, chemical threats, National Institutes of Health, NIH Award, toxic exosure, immune system response, Chemical Weapons, NIH countermeasures against chemical threats, counteract, Skin Repair, toxic chemical exposure

CWRU’s Kurt Lu, MD Receives $3.9 Million NIH Grant to Expand Countermeasures against Chemical Threats, Including Mustard Gas

Kurt Lu, MD, assistant professor of dermatology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, has received a five year, $3.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to expand countermeasures against chemical threats, including mustard gas and mustard-related compounds. The molecular action of mustard on DNA leads to strand breaks and eventual cell death. The goal of the grant is to augment the body’s immune system after exposure, reducing skin swelling and pain as well as enhancing tissue repair.







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