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Science

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Plama from Lasers, New Renewables, Cool Textiles, and More in the DOE Science News Source

Click here to go directly to the DOE Science News Source

Science

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Nasal Spray, Sinus, Drug Delivery, fluid pathways, sinus paths, nasal cavities, Fluid Dynamics, Saikat Basu, Zainab Farzal, Julia S. Kimbell, University Of North Carolina, Division of Fluid Dynamics, DFD, American Physical Society, APS

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Nov-2017 8:00 AM EST

Medicine

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Malaria, Parasite, Infection

Parasites Suck It Up

Depletion of a fatty molecule in human blood propels malaria parasites to stop replicating and causing illness in people and instead to jump ship to mosquitoes to continue the transmission cycle, according to a new study by an international research team.

Medicine

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Holiday Advice, Thanksgiving, thanksgiving food safety, Food Poisoning, UTHealth , Turkey, Food, Illness, Foodborne Illness

Avoid Foodborne Illness This Holiday Season with Tips From UTHealth Experts

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This holiday season, think twice before you do that late-night nibbling at the buffet table, particularly if it has been sitting out for a while. One bite of crab dip or deviled eggs gone bad, and you may be moving your holiday festivities to the bathroom — or the hospital.

Medicine

Science

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Water Quality, Water Quality Research, Water Quality Study, water quality issues, water quality monitoring, Flint Water Crisis, Flint, Michigan, Conference, annual conference, Annual Meeting, Risk Analysis, Risk Assessment

Aging Water Systems Nationwide Pose Threats to Health

Legionnaires disease outbreaks in New York City and toxic levels of lead in Flint, Michigan have raised questions about how to manage risks in aging water systems. Multiple studies assessing the risk of opportunistic pathogens in water systems and the institutional infrastructure failures that led to the Flint water crisis will be discussed at the 2017 Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) Annual Meeting.

Medicine

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Improved Vaccination Coverage Could Yield Major Health and Economic Impacts This Flu Season, Says Virginia Tech Expert

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Medicine

Science

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HIV, virus budding, Virus, virus assembly, Biophysics, Modeling & Simulation, Chemistry, University Of Chicago, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Scientists Find Missing Clue to How HIV Hacks Cells to Propagate Itself

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Computer modeling has helped a team of scientists, including several scholars from the University of Chicago, to decode previously unknown details about the "budding" process by which HIV forces cells to spread the virus to other cells. The findings, published Nov. 7 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may offer a new avenue for drugs to combat the virus.

Medicine

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Sepsis: The Body’s Deadly Response to Infection

Although not as well-known as other medical conditions, sepsis kills more people in the United States than AIDS, breast cancer, or prostate cancer combined. Sepsis is body-wide inflammation, usually triggered by an overwhelming immune response to infection. Though doctors and medical staff are well-aware of the condition—it is involved in 1 in 10 hospital deaths—the condition is notoriously hard to diagnose. In this video, sepsis expert Sarah Dunsmore, a program director with the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), describes what sepsis is and how to recognize it, what kinds of patients are most at risk, and what NIGMS is doing to reduce the impact of this deadly condition.

Medicine

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Pediatrics, Pediatrician, Pediatric Surgery, pediatric neurological surgery, pediatric orthopedic surgery, pediatric orthopaedic surgery, post-operative fever

Early Postoperative Fever in Pediatric Patients Rarely Associated With an Infectious Source

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Post-operative fevers in children are rarely due to infection, yet they are often subjected to non-targeted testing. This conclusion has been widely recognized in adult patients undergoing surgery, but this is the first large-scale study to verify this finding in children.

Medicine

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Inflamation, Lloyd Miller, Dermatology

How the Skin Becomes Inflamed

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Publishing online this week in Cell Host & Microbe, researchers at Johns Hopkins report the discovery of a key underlying immune mechanism that explains why to how our skin becomes inflamed from conditions such as atopic dermatitis, more commonly known as eczema. Toxin-producing bacteria on the surface of our skin induces a protein that causes our own cells to react and cause inflammation.







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