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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Apr-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692632

How Highly Contagious Norovirus Infection Gets Its Start

Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers have shown, in mice, that norovirus infects a rare type of intestinal cell called a tuft cell. Inside tuft cells, norovirus is effectively hidden from the immune system, which could explain why some people continue to shed virus long after they are no longer sick. These “healthy carriers” are thought to be the source of norovirus outbreaks, so understanding how the virus evades detection in such people could lead to better ways to prevent outbreaks.

Released:
11-Apr-2018 4:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692620

Dining Dilemmas Give WFU Students Food for Thought from Dining Room to Treatment Room

Wake Forest University

Wake Forest University students participating in next week’s “Dining Dilemmas” have a healthy appetite for exploring bioethics and building community.

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11-Apr-2018 3:15 PM EDT
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Education

Article ID: 692605

Study Shows How Group B Strep Establishes In Utero Infection, Posing Risk to Baby

Seattle Children's Hospital

Despite its substantial impact on pregnancy outcomes, scientists know little about how group B streptococcus (GBS) establishes an in utero infection. In a paper published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Dr. Lakshmi Rajagopal, a principal investigator in Seattle Children’s Research Institute Center for Global Infectious Disease Research describes a newly uncovered mechanism by which GBS gains access to a woman’s uterus.

Released:
11-Apr-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692592

How Do Children Develop Immunity to Malaria as They Become Older?

Case Western Reserve University

Across the world, over 200 million cases of malaria and nearly 500,000 deaths from the disease occur annually—more than 90 percent of which happen in Africa. Children in Africa can be diagnosed with malaria two or three times a year, a rate that decreases as they become older and develop immunity. But the way children generate and maintain this immunity remains a mystery. Katherine Dobbs, MD, a tropical infectious diseases and malaria researcher, is conducting research in Kenya to find answers by studying white blood cells important to innate immunity, the body’s “first response” to infection.

Released:
11-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692573

Fred Hutch Scientists to Feature Next-Generation T-Cell Therapies, Big Data, Precision Medicine and More at AACR

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center’s latest findings will be featured in about 50 presentations at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, “Driving Innovative Cancer Science to Patient Care,” to be held April 14-18 in Chicago. Here are several highlights:

Released:
10-Apr-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692558

Tick-Borne Disease Epidemic Symposium

Stony Brook Medicine

Tick-borne illnesses are a growing problem on Long Island, and a new season is about to begin. To prepare for this and inform the public, Stony Brook Medicine experts are tackling the topic head on at an April 12 symposium.

Released:
10-Apr-2018 3:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692532

Scientists Uncover Details of Viral Infections That Drive Environmental, Human Health

Ohio State University

New research from The Ohio State University offers a glimpse into the complexity of interactions between bacteria and the viruses – or phages – that infect them.

Released:
10-Apr-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692426

Genetic Screening Tool Identifies How the Flu Infiltrates Cells

University of Chicago Medical Center

Researchers at the University of Chicago have developed a genetic screening tool that identified two key factors that allow the influenza virus to infect human lung cells. The technique uses new gene editing tools to create a library of modified cells, each missing a different gene, allowing scientists to see which changes impact their response to flu. This in turn could identify potential targets for antiviral drugs.

Released:
9-Apr-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692493

Clostridium difficile Infection: Which Surgical Patients Are at Highest Risk?

Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is now the most common hospital-acquired infection, with significant effects on healthcare costs. Surgeons from George Washington University Hospital sought to identify rates of C. difficile infection in patients undergoing common types of colon operations. The authors utilized the American College of Surgeons NSQIP database for 2015 to retrospectively review all cases of elective ileostomy and colostomy reversals.

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10-Apr-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692456

Survival Strategy: How One Enzyme Helps Bacteria Recover From Exposure to Antibiotics

University of Notre Dame

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame focused on an enzyme in gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a pathogen that causes pneumonia and sepsis.

Released:
9-Apr-2018 3:10 PM EDT
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