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Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, lightsource, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SSRL, Nanocrystals, Superlattices, Materials Science

Scientists Watch ‘Artificial Atoms’ Assemble into Perfect Lattices with Many Uses

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Some of the world’s tiniest crystals are known as “artificial atoms” because they can organize themselves into structures that look like molecules, including “superlattices” that are potential building blocks for novel materials. Now scientists from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have made the first observation of these nanocrystals rapidly forming superlattices while they are themselves still growing.

Medicine

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The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Dermatology, dermatophyte, Nanomedicine, Dermatophytosis, Ringworm, Nitric Oxide, Research

Research on Nitric Oxide-Releasing Nanoparticles Reveals Promising Skin Infection Treatment

A research team led by Adam Friedman, MD, associate professor of dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, has found that topically applied nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles are a viable treatment for deep fungal infections of the skin caused by dermatophytes.

Science

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Memristor, neuristor, Artificial Intelligence, Metal Oxide, Nanomaterials, neuromorphic computing, Synchrotron, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Lithium Ion, brain-like computing, Retina, artificial retina , smart camera

Brain-Like Computing Comes Closer in Big Artificial Intelligence Retina Project

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The human brain's computational might in a machine, the dream of computer engineers, comes a step closer thanks to new nanomaterials. Georgia Tech researchers are creating next-gen neuron-mimmicking "memristors" to underly processing "neuristors."

Science

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Nanomachining, Nanotechnology, nano devices, Nanomanufacturing, Chemistry, University Of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science & Engineering, Transistor, Solar Cell, Photolithography

New Method Promises Easier Nanoscale Manufacturing

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Scientists at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a new way to precisely pattern nanomaterials that could open a new path to the next generation of everyday electronic devices.

Science

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Living Computers: RNA Circuits Transform Cells Into Nanodevices

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In new research, Alex Green, a professor at ASU’s Biodesign Institute, demonstrates how living cells can be induced to carry out computations in the manner of tiny robots or computers.

Science

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Phobos in the Picture, Eclipse Watching Advise, Crystals in Space, and More in the Space News Source

The latest in space and astronomy in the Space News Source

Science

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Nanoscience & Technology, 2D materials, condensed matter physics, Electronic Devices, Optical devices, Sensors On A Chip

Multitasking Monolayers

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Two-dimensional materials that can multitask. That is the result of a new process that naturally produces patterned monolayers that can act as a base for creating a wide variety of novel materials with dual optical, magnetic, catalytic or sensing capabilities.

Science

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Batteries, Batteries Electricity Storage Energy, Medical Devices, novel materials

Engineers Invent the First Bio-Compatible, Ion Current Battery

Engineers at the University of Maryland have invented an entirely new kind of battery. It is bio-compatible, because it produces the same kind of electrical energy that the body uses: an ion current.

Science

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spin-waves, Information Processing, Magnetic Materials

NUS Engineers Achieve Significant Breakthrough in Spin Wave Based Information Processing Technology

A research team led by Professor Adekunle Adeyeye from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the NUS Faculty of Engineering, has recently achieved a significant breakthrough in spin wave information processing technology. His team has successfully developed a novel method for the simultaneous propagation of spin wave signals in multiple directions at the same frequency, without the need for any external magnetic field.

Medicine

Science

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Virus, Virology, Building Materials, Construction, Nanomedicine, Nanotechnology, Edward H. Egelman, Peter M. Kasson, University Of Virginia, University of Virginia School of Medicine, UVA School of Medicine, Science, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics, Yellowstone, Yellowstone National Park, Acid, Strange, David Prangishvili , Pasteur Institute, Mo

Indestructible Virus Yields Secret to Creating Incredibly Durable Materials

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It lives in boiling acid that dissolves flesh and bone. Now scientists have unlocked the secrets of the indestructible virus, potentially allowing them to harness its remarkable properties to create super-durable materials and better treat disease.







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