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Article ID: 689374

Neutron Study of Glaucoma Drugs Offers Clues About Enzyme Targets for Aggressive Cancers

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

A team of researchers from ORNL’s Energy and Transportation Science Division is using neutron imaging to study particulate filters that collect harmful emissions in vehicles. A better understanding of how heat treatments and oxidation methods can remove layers of soot and ash from these filters could lead to improved fuel-efficiency.

Released:
12-Feb-2018 1:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Cancer, Cell Biology, Pharmaceuticals, Women's Health, DOE Science News, Energy

Article ID: 689358

Huntington's Disease Provides New Cancer Weapon

Northwestern University

Patients with Huntington’s disease, a fatal genetic illness that causes the breakdown of nerve cells in the brain, have up to 80 percent less cancer than the general population.Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered why Huntington’s is so toxic to cancer cells and harnessed it for a novel approach to treat cancer, a new study reports.

Released:
12-Feb-2018 11:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Cancer, Pharmaceuticals, Neuro, Local - Illinois, Local - Chicago Metro, Grant Funded News

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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689212

Which Commonly Prescribed Drug is More Effective for Infants with Epilepsy?

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Comparison of two of the most commonly prescribed drugs for infants with nonsyndromic epilepsy revealed that levetiracetam was more effective than phenobarbital, according a multicenter, observational study published in JAMA Pediatrics. After six months of single-drug treatment, 40 percent of infants who received levetiracetam met criteria for successful outcome – they did not require a second anti-epileptic drug to control their seizures and they became seizure-free within three months of starting treatment. Only 16 percent of infants treated with phenobarbital achieved the same outcome.

Released:
8-Feb-2018 10:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Children's Health, Epilepsy, Pharmaceuticals, JAMA, Local - Illinois

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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689220

No Llamas Required

Harvard Medical School

Antibodies made by camels, llamas and alpacas allow scientists to study the structure and function of proteins in disease and health. While valuable, the approach is time-consuming, costly and often unsuccessful. Overcoming this barrier, scientists have devised a faster, cheaper and more reliable way to create these critical antibodies using yeast in a test tube.

Released:
8-Feb-2018 11:15 AM EST
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All Journal News, Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals, Nature (journal), Local - Massachusetts, Local - Boston Metro

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Article ID: 689350

There's Already a Better Alternative to Proposed "Right to Try" Legislation: Keep the FDA Involved in Expanded Access

WCG Foundation

Released:
12-Feb-2018 10:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 689304

Microscopic Chariots Deliver Molecules Within Our Cells

Scripps Research Institute

Understanding how the dynein-dynactin complex is assembled and organized provides a critical foundation to explain the underlying causes of several dynein-related neurodegenerative diseases.

Released:
9-Feb-2018 12:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Cell Biology, Mental Health, Neuro, Pharmaceuticals, Nature (journal), Local - California, Grant Funded News

  • Embargo expired:
    7-Feb-2018 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688917

What Happens When Women Stop MS Treatment During Pregnancy?

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Two new studies look at the effects of stopping the newer, stronger drug natalizumab for multiple sclerosis (MS) during pregnancy. Natalizumab is generally prescribed for people with MS who have not responded to or cannot tolerate other treatments for MS as it can have a rare but potentially fatal side effect.

Released:
2-Feb-2018 3:05 PM EST
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Neuro, OBGYN, Pharmaceuticals, Women's Health, Neurology (journal), All Journal News

Article ID: 689161

UPMC Researchers Solving Treatment Resistance in Most Common Breast Cancer

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

For the first time researchers have identified recurrent ESR1 fusion proteins in human breast cancer, to understand how they function and help lead to improved treatments for the disease.

Released:
7-Feb-2018 12:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 689130

UAB Research Funding Continues to Increase

University of Alabama at Birmingham

UAB ranked 15th nationally among public universities in research expenditures and topped $238 million in NIH funding for FY 2016.

Released:
7-Feb-2018 9:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 689055

Chemically Modified Drug Shows Promise for HIV Treatment and Elimination

University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC)

Significant breakthrough could hasten an eventual HIV cure as modified antiviral drug is able to reach cells and tissues where HIV resides

Released:
7-Feb-2018 7:05 AM EST
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AIDS and HIV, All Journal News, Infectious Diseases, Pharmaceuticals, Nature (journal)


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