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Article ID: 698715

No single test identifies all ROS1+ lung cancer patients

University of Colorado Cancer Center

University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows that common laboratory tests used to determine ROS1 status may return false-negative results, meaning that some patients who could benefit from ROS1-directed therapy may be slipping through the cracks.

Released:
8-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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    8-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698538

Innate Lymphoid Cells (ILCs) form an essential line of defense against enteric bacteria

La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

Mice deficient in innate lymphoid cells are vulnerable to lethal infection by the bacterial pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica (YE), which causes some forms of food poisoning. Moreover, activation by a cytokine called LIGHT, which is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily, is necessary for ILCs to mount an anti-bacterial response.

Released:
6-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698671

New Research Pinpoints Pathways Ebola Virus Uses to Enter Cells

Texas Biomedical Research Institute

A new study at Texas Biomedical Research Institute is shedding light on the role of specific proteins that trigger a mechanism allowing Ebola virus to enter cells to establish replication.

Released:
8-Aug-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Aug-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698614

Proof-of-Concept Technique Makes Nanoparticles Attractive for New Medications

University of Utah Health

Researchers at University of Utah Health developed a proof-of-concept technology using nanoparticles that could offer a new approach for oral medications.

Released:
6-Aug-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698694

World’s Fastest Creature May Also be One of the Smallest

Georgia Institute of Technology

Ask most people to identify the fastest animal on Earth and they’ll suggest a cheetah, falcon or even a sailfish. To that list of speedy animals, Georgia Institute of Technology assistant professor Saad Bhamla would like to add the Spirostomum ambiguum, a tiny single-celled protozoan that achieves blazing-fast acceleration while contracting its worm-like body.

Released:
7-Aug-2018 7:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698656

Researchers Look to Worms for a New Model of a Peripheral Nervous System Disease

Scripps Research Institute

"In humans, being able to tweak levels of TTR degradation could act as a means of stopping TTR toxicity."

Released:
7-Aug-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Aug-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698229

New Method Helps Determine Effectiveness of Interventions in Reducing Spread of HIV

New York University

Using genetic sequencing to understand the evolutionary relationships among pathogens, an international team of researchers—including several from the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at New York University—has developed a new method to determine how effective interventions are against the spread of infectious diseases like HIV.

Released:
30-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698612

Researchers Uncover Potential New Drug Targets in the Fight Against HIV

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins scientists report they have identified two potential new drug targets for the treatment of HIV. The finding is from results of a small, preliminary study of 19 people infected with both HIV—the virus that causes AIDS—and the hepatitis C virus. The study revealed that two genes—CMPK2 and BCLG, are selectively activated in the presence of type 1 interferon, a drug once used as the first line of treatment against hepatitis C.

Released:
7-Aug-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698628

Chemistry Research ‘Rocks’ New Data about Ancient Life

University of California San Diego

Sulfur isotopes can serve as tracers of atmospheric oxygen, and new data collected from the present-day atmosphere in China by an international team of researchers, led by the University of California San Diego, indicate remarkable similarity to the isotopic footprint found in ancient rocks. This opens up new interpretations of the Archean Period’s sulfur isotope sedimentary signature—a proxy for the origins and evolution of atmospheric oxygen and early life on Earth.

Released:
6-Aug-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698613

Doxorubicin disrupts the immune system to cause heart toxicity

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Researchers have found an important contributor to heart pathology caused by the cancer drug doxorubicin — disruption of metabolism that controls immune responses in the spleen and heart. This allows chronic, non-resolving inflammation that leads to advanced heart failure.

Released:
6-Aug-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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