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Medicine

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Autoimmune Warriors, Controversial Ciggarette Coupons, Online Drug Education, and More in the Healthcare News Source

The latest research, features and announcements in healthcare in the Healthcare News Source

Medicine

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Cardiovascular Aging New Frontier and Old Friends, Menopause, Blood Vessel Health, Fitness

Menopausal Status May Better Predict Blood Vessel Health in Women Than Fitness Level

High physical fitness is known to be related to enhanced blood vessel dilation and blood flow (endothelial function) in aging men. However, for women, endothelial function and the effect of exercise may be related more to menopausal status than fitness.

Medicine

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The Myositis Association, Inclusion Body Myositis, Myositis, TMA Annual Patient Conference, B-Temia, Exoskeleton, Dermoskeleton, human augmentation systems, international myositis experts

Exoskeleton Allows Disabled Man to Run Again

Former police officer Martin Jarry ran a 10K, even though he has inclusion body myositis, a rare debilitating disease of the muscles.

Medicine

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adaptive sports, adaptive surfing, Surfing, Hospital For Special Surgery, People With Disabilities, Pediatric Orthopedics, Physical Therapy

Hospital Makes a Splash: Adaptive Surfing Trip for Patients with Disabilities Set for Long Island

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The Adaptive Sports Academy at Hospital for Special Surgery is enabling young patients with cerebral palsy, an amputation or other physical challenge to participate in athletic activities they never dreamed possible. Many are looking forward to a surfing trip on Long Island scheduled for August 14.

Medicine

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Health, Cardiology, Family Medicine, General, Geriatrics, OB GYN, Radiology and imaging, Research, Diet, Fitness

Risk of a Fatty Heart Linked to Race, Type of Weight Gain

A woman’s race and where on her body she packs on pounds at midlife could give her doctor valuable clues to her likelihood of having greater volumes of heart fat, a potential risk factor for heart disease, according to new research led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

Science

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Latest Research From ACSM: Protein Supplements- Gains Aren’t What You Think

At the gym, on the web, and in print media, it is typical to see marketing messages touting the value of protein supplementation to enhance the gains that can be achieved with resistance exercise training.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Exercise, Gym Membership, gym, Working Out

Exercise Incentives Do Little to Spur Gym-Going, Study Shows

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Even among people who had just joined a gym and expected to visit regularly, getting paid to exercise did little to make their commitment stick, according to a new study from Case Western Reserve University.

Medicine

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Childhood Obesity, Physical Fitness, UCLA Health Sound Body Sound Mind program, Physical Education

UCLA Health Sound Body Sound Mind Forms Advisory Council

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The UCLA Health Sound Body Sound Mind program, which fights childhood obesity by installing comprehensive fitness programs in middle and high schools, has formed an academic advisory council of leading experts in physical education, fitness and wellness.

Medicine

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Kidney Disease, Exercise, Dialysis, Chronic Kidney Disease, CKD, Aerobic Exercise

Aerobic Exercise Found Safe for Non-Dialysis Kidney Disease Patients

A new study finds that moderate exercise does not impair kidney function in some people with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The study—the first to analyze the effects of exercise on kidney disease that does not require dialysis—is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology.

Medicine

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Stroke, Motor Function, hand function, Stroke Recovery, Limb Function, Sensimotor Function, Sensimotor Neurons

Stroke Recovery Window May Be Wider Than We Think

Stroke survivors may experience delayed recovery of limb function up to decades after injury, according to a new case study.







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