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Science

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Baleen, Marine Biology, Evolution, Paleontology, NYIT College of Ostepathic Medicine, Whales

Ancient Fossils Suggest Whales Used Teeth to Filter Out Prey

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How baleen whales became filter feeders is widely debated among scientists—but now anatomy researchers at NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine may finally solve this mystery.

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dinosaur discovery, Dinosaur, dinosaur physiology, Dinosaurs, neurovascular networks, Palaeontology, 3D imaging, Fossils, Trigeminal, Feeding, Courtship, Nests

Sensitive Faces Helped Dinosaurs Eat, Woo and Take Temperature, Suggests Study

Dinosaurs' faces might have been much more sensitive than previously thought, and crucial to tasks from precision eating and testing nest temperature to combat and mating rituals, according to a University of Southampton study.

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Botany, Fossils, Palaeontology, New Zealand, Trees

Australian Origin Likely for Iconic New Zealand Tree

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Ancestors of the iconic New Zealand Christmas Tree, Pōhutukawa, may have originated in Australia, new fossil research from the University of Adelaide suggests.

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Ndsu, North Dakota State University, Geosciences, Career, National Science Foundation, Paleoecology, Shelled Marine Animals, Late Triassic

NDSU Assistant Professor Receives National Science Foundation CAREER Award

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A North Dakota State University assistant professor has received a national award that will bring more than $500,000 to the geosciences department at NDSU and provide research opportunities for students.

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Mexico, California, Otter, Sea Otter, Fossils, Mammals, Migration, Miocene, Pliocene Epoch, Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Great American Biotic Interchange, Enhydritherium terraenovae , Juchipila Basin

Ancient Otter Tooth Found in Mexico Suggests Mammals Migrated Across America

An ancient otter tooth recently discovered in Mexico suggests certain mammals migrated across America during the Miocene geologic epoch, roughly 23 million to 5.3 million years ago. The new hypothesized route questions other theories such as migrations above Canada and through Panama, and has implications for a much larger biologic event — the Great American Biotic Interchange, when land bridges were formed and animals dispersed to and from North America and South America.

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Palaeontology, Sea Life, Ecosystem

Lost Ecosystem Found Buried in Mud of Southern California Coastal Waters

Paleontologists Adam Tomašových of the Slovak Academy of Sciences and Susan Kidwell of the University of Chicago examine a lost ecosystem of scallops and shelled marine organisms called brachiopods in a new study.

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UNLV Human Paleontology Expert Available to Discuss Discovery of 300,000 Year Old Human Remains

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Science

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Paleontology, Dinosaur

How the Famous Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Bone Bed Came to Be

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The Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry is the densest collection of Jurassic dinosaur fossils. Since its discovery in the 1920s, numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of the quarry. Were the dinosaurs poisoned? Did they die due to drought? Were they trapped in quick sand? A new study suggests that the quarry represents numerous mortality events which brought the dinosaurs to the site over time, rather than a single fatal event.

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Life on Terra Firma Began with an Invasion

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Scientists are now confident animal life on solid ground started with a few short bursts of marine creatures making the leap from the oceans. New research at the University of Portsmouth also paints a clear picture of how animals rapidly spread out and changed once they made the leap.

Science

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Paleontology, Precambrian, Ediacaran Period, computational fluid dynamics, Parvancorina

Life in the Precambrian May Have Been Much Livelier Than Previously Thought

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An interdisciplinary study suggests that the strange creatures which lived in the Garden of the Ediacaran more than 540 million years ago before animals came on the scene may have been much more dynamic than experts have thought.







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